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2ndC Roman silver sent for ID

this is a posthumous commemorative denarius of Faustina Sr., wife of Antoninus Pius, mother of Faustina Jr who was the wife of Marcus Aurelius, and so both Aurelius' mother-in-law and grandmother of emperor-to-be Commodus.  Not all the Faustina coins are quite so simple - Faustina Jr. had separate lifetime issues by Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius, and posthumous issues by Marcus Aurelius. Faustina Sr.'s coins, however, can be divided into two main groups - Lifetime and Posthumous.  She died in AD 141, but the majority of her posthumous coins were issued after 147.  At this time, her daughter was made Augusta and that title was dropped from her name on posthumous issues.  It's thought that the greater number of her posthumous coins as deified (DIVA) were issued around the 10th & 15th anniversaries of her death (151 & 156 AD), but since there is no clear succession of types to assist in dating, most references merely say "post 147 AD." 
This reverse is inscribed AVGVSTA and shows Ceres holding a torch. There is a large series of AVGVSTA reverses. Ceres, along with Juno, Vesta and Venus are the most commonly seen characters on the reverses of her posthumous coinage. 
 
Mark

 

1696 William III milled silver sixpence - Norwich mint

1327 Édward III hammered silver penny - pellet at centre

class 15d

 

1697 William III milled silver sixpence
Celtic cosmetic wode grinder

Roman silver coin sent for ID

This appears at first glance to be a normal denarius of Tiberius - the common type, struck continuously throughout his reign from 12-37 AD.  As you're probably aware, denarii of this type have for years been successfully marketed as the so-called "Tribute Penny", in reference to the passage in Matthew.  Since I've commented several times on the likelihood (or lack thereof) of this coin being in normal circulation in Judaea c 25-30 AD, I won't belabor the point.  Folks may believe what they want to believe - they will regardless.  Did you do the straightening?  Whoever did it was lucky, since the silver shows significant crystallization and it appears that it could have broken in the process very easily (and may yet) to judge by the surface fracturing along the bend-axis on the reverse.
This piece is unusual mostly because the workmanship is so crude, relatively speaking. 
At this point, I was going to include a link to a more typical piece of this type, but my website's server appears to be down at the moment. 
You describe it as "thick". The weight, however, although at the higher end of the range, is within normal variation for these.  My guess is that this might be an ancient counterfeit - made to deceive, IOW, rather than the sort of officially sanctioned copies represented by the contemporary copy radiates.  It's possible that it was struck in a somewhat less fine silver by someone who had the skills necessary to create believable dies - or who was in league with someone skilled. However, I'm basing this guess primarily on the appearance of the lettering - which is blobby and uneven.  It's also possible that it's just a usual official piefce and is the product of "Friday afternoon workmanship" on the legends, since the main devices are relatively well - if a bit coarsely - executed. 
 
Mark

 

As dug and 'cooked'

BC Roman Republican silver sent for ID

This one is L Cassius Longinus, 63 BC.
Obv: Veiled and diademed head of Vesta left, 2-handled cup behind, control letter before.
Rx:Togate citicizen standing left depositing ballot inscribed, V (Uti Rogas) in voting box; LONGIN III V behind. 
CRR 935, RSC/Babelon Cassia 10, SR 364.
 
Mark

 

Venetian Soldino issued by Doge Michele Steno (1400-1413).
Obv: MICHAEL STEN' DVX (Michele Steno, Doge). Doge standing left, holding standard.
Rev: S MARCVS VENETI (Saint Mark of Venice). Winged and nimbate lion of Saint Mark facing.

1361 Edward III hammmered silver penny - Transitional period

CIVI/TAS/DOR/ELME - Durham mint

1215 Henry III hammered silver short cross cut half penny
1327 Edward III hammered silver half penny - London mint
1560-1 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat - Cross crosslet mintmark
1569 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver sixpence
18thC clog fastener
Roman mount
Medieval D buckle
WWII Royal Fuseliers cap badge

2ndC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

16.36g, 27.34mm

The sestertius is either Antoninus Pius or Marcus Aurelius as Caesar (during the reign of Antoninus Pius).  Their portraits are just too similar during that period - 139-161 AD - to be able to tell them apart in this photo - there's simply not enough contrast even to be able to tweak-up some bits of legend to try to tell them apart.  The reverse is probably Liberalitas - they did a number of donatives to the public and so the Liberalitas reverses are pretty common.  Probabaly no other 20-yr period saw the striking of more types of sestertii, so pinning this one down any closer without being able to read any legend is just not likely to happen.  If you can take a photo in oblique light that allows some shadows to point-up what relief may be visible - or if it cleans up to be more legible, send me more photos and I'll see if I can pin it down more closely for you.
 
Mark 

 

4thC House of Constantine Roman bronze sent for ID

3.71g, 22.01mm

The Constantine is a SOLI INVICTO COMITI reduced-module follis from Lugdunum.  It was rather early in the series of size reductions, so it's still fairly substantial by the standards of the later 4th century, although the follis was nearly the size of a 2nd century sestertius when first introduced - not quite so thick, but similar diameter.
with the field- and mint marks like this
   
F  |  T
P L C
 
It belongs to the issue of 309-10 AD - right at the beginning of Constantine's general acceptance as an Augustus.
 
catalog: RIC VI Lugdunum 308.

 

1567 Elizabeth hammered silver sixpence
16thC hooked clothing fastener - gilded
Stunning complete medieval decorated purse bar and swivel

1341 Edward III hammered silver penny florin penny

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1878 Victoria milled silver sixpence

C10thC Saxon harness cheek piece
Very unusual 2nd C Roman fibular brooch - not a design I know
Medieval mount with 2 integral lugs
19thC Vicrorian milled silver 3 pence
18thC silver clog fastener
1216 Henry III hammered silver cut half penny
17thC Enameled decorated crotal bell
15thC open topped thimble
Medieval gilded mount with 2 integral lugs
Medieval gilded mount with 2 integral lugs
16thC Elizabeth 1st hammered silver sixpence
1578 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat
1885 Victoria milled silver sixpence
19thC livery button
1634 Charles 1st trade weight - Crown CR cipher
1603 James 1st hammered silver hlaf groat

1341 Edward III hammered silver penny florin penny

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

2 - Medieval badges Ref Mitchiner p244 939 - 941

 

'A badge for a Knight of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre in bronze and dating somewhere around C13/14th possibly very slightly later . This is a very scarce item and it relates to The Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem being a Catholic chivalric order of Knighthood that traces its roots to Godfrey of Bouillon, principal leader of the First Crusade. According to reliable sources in the Vatican and Jerusalem, it began in historical reality as a mixed clerical and lay confraternity (association) of pilgrims which gradually grew around the most central of the Christian holy places in the Middle East, the Holy Sepulchre or the tomb of Jesus Christ.This would have been a pin for a member of the order , there is a mark on the reverse where the original pin would have been fixed '

 

1696 William III milled silver sixpence - Norwich mint

1471-1483 Edward VII hammered silver groat - Rose on breast

London mint

Roman gold ring -decorated with hanging fruit and vine - reported as treasure to museum

1.46g, 24.49mm

Saxon C600-775 AD Silver Sceat - sent to Fitzwilliam museum for recording and ID

1.05g, 12.41mm

1843 Victorian milled silver sixpence

 

Saxon hanging heavily gilded pendant ??

39.97mm L

You're correct that this coin has a Shewolf & Twins reverse which is typically found on the VRBS ROMA, City of Rome commemorative, reduced-module folles introduced around 330 AD., at the time Constantinople became the official seat of Constantine's government. These have a helmeted and mantled bust of the allegorical personification of the City of Rome facing left on their obverses.  At approximately 17mm (although at 1.41gm, it's on the light side) it's most likely from the emissions of c 330-333/5, rather than the later ones of 333/5-337 which tended to be even smaller.  At some mints, they were even continued as a type past the death of Constantine in 337, although often paired with a "Vota" or a GLORIA EXERCITVS soldiers & standard reverse rather than the wolf & twins.  This atypical use of a subject other than an Imperial bust on the obverse was a convenient political "dodge" for cities which hadn't necessarily declared-for or been brought securely into the fold of one or another of Constantine's sons, who had some "disagreement" about who had inherited what territory or was to rule where, etc.
 
Unfortunately, the exergual area is too far off-flan for me to be able to make an informed guess as to the city of origin - top seriph-tips of a few letters are visible, but not enough to really be able to tell what was intended.
 
For a somewhat clearer view of the type, see: http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album165/52_VRBS_CYZ  or:  http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album165/57_VRBS_TES and as you can see from the first example, these were originally silver-washed, although the silvering very seldom survives to the present day.
 
Mark
 
1819 George III milled silver sixpence
16thC Tudor fretwork button
1634 Charles 1st trade weight - Crown C cipher

1461-85 Edward IV hammered silver groat - Crown mint mark

London mint

16th/17th gold ring - reported as treasure to museum - no hallmarks

22.55mm,0.80g

Beat to death mid 4thC House of Constantine Roman gold coin

3.74g,21.23mm

15thC lead token
15thC open topped thimble
1645-6 Charles 1st hammered silver half groat

 

BC Roman republican silver sent for ID

This is Q. Cassius Longinus, 55 BC.  RSC/Babelon Cassia 7.
SR 391, CRR 916, RRC428/3
 
Mark

 

Medieval D buckle
18thC buckle
1936 George V milled silver florin (24 pence)
Medieval hammered silver penny
1696 William III milled silver sixpence - lovetoken
1634 Scottish Charles 1st hammered silver 20 pence
1817 George III milled silver sixpence

1341 Edward III hammered silver penny florin penny

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1649 Commonwealth hammered silver penny
1697 William III milled silver shilling (12 pence)

17thC Figure on horseback coin weight - low countries and Germany

for rijder, Burgundian rider or rijdergulden

16thC deorated hawking bell - reported as treasure
1550-1650 buckle
1500-1700 mount
Mid 4thC House of Constantine Roman bronze - two soldiers standing

Starting to 'cook' up nice

 

4thC House of Constantine Roman silver coin straight into the 'cooker' to remove crust - sent to Mark for ID

and it's the very last of the Constantinians, Julian "The Apostate" - or "The Philosopher", depending on your point of view - the budding, new Christian Church definitely favored the former since he is probably best known for trying to revive the virtues which existed in Pagan times.
His story is not altogether unlike that of Claudius. A "minor" family member, he was always in the background eclipsed by his more famous cousins, the sons of Constantine the Great. He became Caesar almost solely in name alone in 333. Assigned the administration of the less glamorous Western segment of the Empire, he managed to survive the "purge" of competing family members immediately after Constantine's death in 337 in which his cousins Delmatius and Hannaballianus (among others) were conveniently dispatched and removed from the competition.
He took advantage of the opportunities his position afforded to both educate himself and to become proficient in the arts of war and command, and by not picking any fights - fighting only when it was necessary - he managed to outlive them all. He was proclaimed Emperor by his troops in 360 which brought him into conflict with his cousin Constantius II.
On the eve of battle in this conflict, in which he was badly outmatched and expected to be defeated, he received a summons to parley. Expecting to be taken prisoner and/or murdered, as it turned out, Constantius had died during the previous night and he was instead informed that he was now the uncontested emperor of all of the Roman Empire in 361 AD.
 
His Imperium was a short one, however, and he lived only another 2 years, dying in a battle with the Sasanid Persians - although his rule was remembered as particularly just and even-handed.
 
This piece is from his short tenure as Augustus.  It's a Siliqua, a denomination introduced in the reforms of Constantine - the first circulating piece in good silver the Roman Empire had seen since the early-mid 3rd century. It appears to be from the mint at Arles, due to the eagle in the medallion at the top of the wreath which was only done in Arles, but the mintmark should be PCONST (P, S or T for the officina designation preceding the CONST - for Constantiniana, the name of Arles at this time), but for some reason, yours doesn't seem to have the officina mark.  I'll see if I can find out whether this is a known variation or not.
 
Mark
 

 

1475 AD 'Sun in shield' Bronze uniface coin weight for the 'ecu au soleil' French gold coin

French manufacture, probably made in Paris

Venetian Soldino issued by Doge Michele Steno (1400-1413).
Obv: MICHAEL STEN' DVX (Michele Steno, Doge). Doge standing left, holding standard.
Rev: S MARCVS VENETI (Saint Mark of Venice). Winged and nimbate lion of Saint Mark facing.
1592-5 Elizabeth hammered silver shilling (12 pence)- Tun mintmark
1783 Dutch Provinical copper coin
19thC Kings Dragoon guards button
Grenadier Guards
Officer - 1800-1819
Royal fuseliers cap badge
1550-1650 buckle
1634 Charles 1st hammered silver half groat

Nice detail on this mid 4thC Barbarous radiate Roman bronze - sent for ID

This is a posthumous commemorative of Claudius II, Gothicus - 268-270 AD - "DIVO CLAVDIO".  These were produced at the absolute nadir of the Empire under Quintillus and at the beginning of Aurelian's reign, and also were extensively copied.  For that reason, unless a piece is either exceptionally well-made and oversize, or exceptionally crude, blundered and/or small, it's really difficult to be certain if any given specimen official or not.  The Empire was in such a mess at the time that I'm not certain it even matters with this issue.
 
The reverse type is CONSECRATIO and shows the facade of an altar-enclosure with "eternal flame" burning on top - so you have the reverse image rotated about 120º clockwise of proper orientation.
It's a very common type in general, but since no one's all that sure where to draw the line between official and unoffical origin with these, they're an interesting case-study in how to tell one from the other.
 
Mark

 

1928 George V milled silver sixpence
WWII New Zealand Forces button

Royal Artillery button

1840 - 1855

19thC livery button
15thC lead token

A Late Medieval/ Early Post-Medieval (15th-early 16th century) cast one-piece copper-alloy mount, convex and cinquefoil in shape

Broad period: MEDIEVAL
Period from: MEDIEVAL

Period to: POST MEDIEVAL

Date from: AD 1400
Date to: AD 1630

Victorian silver mount - sterling silver

A Late Medieval/ Early Post-Medieval (15th-early 16th century) cast one-piece copper-alloy mount, star shaped

Broad period: MEDIEVAL
Period from: MEDIEVAL

Period to: POST MEDIEVAL

Date from: AD 1400
Date to: AD 1630

Roman decorated copper alloy pelta-shaped mount. It is semi-circular, with the upper surface having a incised decoration

Broad period: ROMAN
Period from: ROMAN

Date from: AD 40
Date to: AD 400

4thC Barbarous radiate Roman bronze - sent for ID

I'll need to see if there's anything I can tweak out of these images which, frankly, look like the Ishiahara color-blindness test circles in these photos.  Yes, it's probably a radiate and if it's primarily Æ or low-end billon, we can date it to the era 265-290 with some certainty without needing to know any more.  To get a lot more detail about/from this piece will take some work.

17thC mount with 2 integral lugs
17thC Christopher Bayles of Colchester hammered copper trade farthing - died 1666
Georgian trade weight
Roman hooked mount

17thC spur fitting
17thC silver bell - reported as treasure to museum
17thC Charles II silver button - reported as treasure to museum
Mid 4thC House of Constantine Roman bronze coin - 2 soldiers standing type
 
1690-1720 shoe or knee buckle
1550-1650 buckle
 

Small Roman bronze - sent for ID

12.43mm,1.37g

I'm not completely sure this is a regular Roman Imperial issue - there's so little useful detail left on the reverse and although some of the obverse legend seems to be there, I can't make any sense out of it.  Then there's the stylistic issues - like the potato-nose, protruberant lips, etc.  I suspect this is a contemporary copy of one of the SPES REIPVBLICAE "campgates" of Magnus Maximus or his son, Flavius Victor.  This would place it no earlier than the mid-late 380's - or possibly later.
 
That is my best guess, unless you can make-out something other than a rectilinear structure on the reverse - that's all I can see, but stylistically, it's nothing at all like the typical campgate Æ4's of the era.
 
Another possiblity might be that it's later than the Roman era and is some local warlord, king or chieftan from the early medieval period. 
 
At any rate, I can't say with authority that I know exactly what it is, except that if it is "Roman", it's rather unlike anything I've seen before - particularly from British digs.
 
Mark
After closer examination, I'm willing to say this looks a lot like an antoninianus of Carausius, who you probably know was the emperor of the British Roman Empire c 287-293 AD.  Looking carefully at what remains of the obverse lettering I think I can see IMP CARAV... I think I can see ML XXI.. in the exergue, which would make it Mint of London, and I can make out a G at the end of the reverse legend.  Given the likelihood of any piece from this reign to portray Pax, I'll make a guess that it's the common PAX AVG type with Pax standing left holding an olive -branch and scepter, although Hilaritas and Laetitia are also possibilities.
 

Mark  

 

 
Since I was a little unsure at first, I posted photos of this piece and asked for input from a few other experienced coin folks.
This is, so far as I can tell, a local, contemoprary copy of a Constantinian GLORIA EXERCITVS (Æ3) 2 soldiers standing, flanking 2 standards.  The prototype was produced at all mints across the Empire in c 330-335 AD.
 
I've seen a number of British-found copies, of "Minimus' and Minissisimus" module, which use as their prototype the issues of the early 330's - and/or the later issues with a single standard between the soldiers.
 
It's uncertain whom the portrait was supposed to emulate, since I do not believe Jimmy Durante was a member of the family of Constantine, but these were struck for all 4 living male members in that time-frame.  It's not too much of a stretch to make-out "...STAN..." or "...STANT..." above the portrait - and that may even be "...CIT..." at 3:00-4:00 on the reverse.  I would give you the URL's for some similar pieces in my collection, but my website server is still hors de combat, although the folks in the Classics department seem finally to be trying to do something about it.
 
Mark

 

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross farthing

Obv HENRCIVS REX

Rev ** G.IL ** Moneyer Gilbert of Canterbury mint

1180 Henry II hammered silver short cross farthing

Obv HENRICVS REX

Moneyer Gocelm - Winchester mint

1180 Henry II hammered silver short cross farthing Class 1a-1b

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev **AIN V - Moneyer Alain - London mint

1603 James 1st hammered silver half groat

1351-61 Edward III hammered silver penny -Pre treaty

Rev EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/DVR/REM

1351-61 Edward III hammered silver penny -Pre treaty A - annulets in 4 quadrants

Rev EDWARDVS REX ANGLE F

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

Stock Jetton for the Queen and her almony 14th to15th C

Emblem of Queen marguerite de Provence, wife of Louis IX

Moor's head right with hair bound

Obv X AVE MARIA GRACIA PLNA

 

3rd Essex militia - Napoleonic wars period
19thC corporation button

Henry VI hammered silver half groat- 11 arcs to tressure

Calais May/July 1422-1430

Obv HENRIC DI GRA REX ANGL X F

Rev VIL/LA/CAL/IS - Calais mint

The Board of Agriculture organised the Land Army during the Great War, starting activities in 1915. Towards the end of 1917 there were over 250,000 - 260,000 women working as farm labourers. 20,000 in the land army itself.

1818 George III milled silver sixpence
Georgian 'Fat Boy' statue
LS Army button ??
20thC silver horse shoe mount
1697 William III milled silver sixpence - Coventry mint

1461- 1485 Edward IV hammered silver groat -First reign Type VII - Quatrefoils at neck, Initial mark crown

Rev EDWARD DI GRA REX x ANGL Z FRANC

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

 

1816 George III milled silver sixpence
1920 George V milled silver sixpence

Roman tweezers
c1350-1500 Medieval buckle with integral plate
18thC buckle

18thC apothecary measure
18th silver button/toggle with green glass stone
1933 George V milled silver sixpence

Huge German States 1738 - 8 Gute Groschen milled silver coin

29.12mm, 5.13g

1250- 1400 AD Medieval buckle with integral plate

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev /VND/NIC- Moneyer Nicole of London mint

1582 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat

1341 Edward II hammered silver florin penny

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1550-1650 buckle
17thC hooked buckle
18thC buckle
19thC harness buckle
1250-1500 AD Medieval D buckle
1250-1450 AD Medieval annular buckle
Roman buckle tongue
1550-1700 buckle
1250-1500 AD Medieval D buckle
Medieval D buckle with integral plate
1400-1500 buckle
19thC Rifle Brigade button

1341 Edward III hammered silver florin penny

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross farthing

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev /ONL/ - Lincoln or London mint

4thC Barbarous radiate Roman bronze - sent for ID

Claudius II, Gothicus - 268-270 AD. Antoninianus. Reverse is SECVRITAS PVBLICA - which you can tell from the "legs akimbo" pose, reclining at ease against a cippus or short column.
Coming, as it did, at the absolute darkest hour for the Roman Empire (or the darkest hour from which it recovered, at any rate), the reign of Gothicus is notable for the incredibly low standards of production of the coins - at least the Æ/billon antoniniani - so this is really a quite nice specimen, aside from the oxidation.
 
Mark

 

1760 British coin weight - 27 shillings -

Obv S 27

43rd Regiment
Monmouthshire Light Infantry
Officer - 1830-1855
19thC The Royal Regiment button
Huge George 1st trade weight - Crown G cipher London
17thC button
Complete Georgian watch winder with winding arm
19thC livery button
19thC monogrammed livery button
1704 Queen Anne trade weight - Crown A cipher
20thC Elizabeth II 1oz trade weight - Crown ER cipher
Not sure if this is a bayonet chape or a candle snuffer ?

'May we be happy' badge

Brownies badge ?

Medieval mount with 2 rivet fixings
Debased Roman silver coin - straight into the 'cooker' to remove the crud

Neat medieval silver needle find - six sided - reported as treasure to museum

1.73g, 40.53mm L

1649 Commonwealth half groat
1839 Victorian milled silver sixpence
17thC German lead bale seal

7th City of London Battalion

1908 - 7th (City of London) Battalion formed.

The ‘Shiny Seventh’ was the nickname of the 7th (City of London) Battalion The London Regiment which, prior to the formation of the Territorial Force in April 1908, had been the 3rd City of London Rifle Volunteers. During the Great War it formed two active battalions, 1/7th and 2/7th.

The 1/7th landed in France in March 1915 with 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division (in May these became 140th Brigade, 47th Division) and remained with it untill January 1918. Its first major action was at Festubert in May 1915, and subsequently it fought at Loos (September 1915), Vimy (May 1916), High Wood (September 1916) Butte de Warlencourt (October 1916) , Messines (June 1917) and Cambrai (November 1917).

The 2/7th was raised in September 1914 and landed in France in January 1917 with 174th Brigade 58th (London) Division, fighting its first major battle at Bullecourt in May and then took part in the Third Ypres offensive in September-October 1917.

In January 1918, following the reorganisation of the BEF from four to three battalions per brigades, the two battalions amalgamated becoming 7th London, in 174th Brigade 58th (London) Division, in which it served to the end of the war.

1199-1216 King John hammered silver short cross penny Class 5c

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev WALTER.ON LVND+ Moneyer Walter of London mint

1696 William III milled silver sixpence

George II trade weight - Crown G cipher

London

The Devonshire regiment cap badge

Tiny - 1634 Charles 1st hammered silver half penny - no legend rose each side

0.24g,9.49mm

1839 Victoria milled silver sixpence
1890 Victoria milled silver sixpence
1859 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1351 - 1353 Edward III hammered silver half groat - Pre treaty series C - annulet stops, no trefoils over crown

Obv + EDWARDVS.REX.ANGL.FRANC

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1568 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver three pence

1216 Henry III hammered silver qtr penny

Reversed barred N and R

1217/8 Henry III hammered silver penny - Class 7c

Interesting that Class 7c does not normally have pellets in curls ?

Rev NICHOLE.ON.LVD - Moneyer Nichole of London mint

1247 Henry III hammered silver voiled long cross half penny

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev **/RIO/NLV/ Moneyer Heni of London mint

18thC Royal navy silver cufflinks

1341 Edward III hammered silver florin penny

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1837-1897 Victorian Commemorative medallion

Longest British reign

Georgian buckle
Medieval spur rowel
Georgian watch winders
Roman mount
1464 Rose and crown coin weight - gold half ryal

1760 British coin weight - 9 shillings -

Obv S 9

4thC Barbarous radiate Roman bronze
16thC Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat
1500-1700 Spur fitting
Medieval prism mount
17thC lead token
WMB corporation button ?
1500-1700 Spur

A Post Medieval cast copper alloy lozenge shaped mount

Chronology

Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Period from: POST MEDIEVAL

Date from: Circa AD 1500
Date to: Circa AD 1700

Roman knife pommel
Lots of Roman 'grots' in the pouches
1500-1650 buckle

Saxon silver penny of Æthelred II 978 AD sent for recording and ID

1.22g,20.34mm

This coin (EMC 2011.0084) belongs to the First Hand type (note the absence of a sceptre on the obverse and the plain sleeve without a curve at each side). The Benediction Hand type has two fingers bent in blessing.

The moneyer is probably Eadsige or Wynsige.

With thanks,

Martin

 

Saxon C600-775 AD Silver Sceat sent for recording and ID

1.14g,12.06mm

Many thanks.

I have recorded the new coin (Series D (Type 8)) as EMC 2011.0085.

Best wishes,

Martin

 

13thC Medieval heraldic shield pendant - red, green and gold enameling

1285/6 Edward 1st hammered silver farthing - new issue inner circle both sides - Type 28 - Unbarred A

Rev EDWARDVS REX A

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

11.41mm,0.32g

Debased Roman silver coin - straight into the 'cooker' - as cooked

 

4thC Roman silver coin sent for ID

16.92mm,1.16g

This is a Denarius of Elagabalus - 218-222 AD. As such it's hardly the most debased of Roman silver - it was still at least in the vicinity of 50% fine.  Even though you can barely make out the reverse type, I happened to recognize Victory floating between a pair of shields - looking rather like an anachronistic segue - I have a specimen of the same type.  Unfortunately this one's reverse was struck from badly worn dies, but you can see what's going on.

http://www.ancientpeddler.com/apgallery/displayimage.php?album=358&pos=28

His official title/name was Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Pius (as was Caracalla's). This causes a lot of confusion among those not in-the-know and I regularly see coins of Elagabalus and Caracalla mis-identified as Antoninus Pius (138-161 AD. - I recently picked-up an incredible deal on a rare silver antoninianus of Caracalla which had been misidentified as a denarius of Antoninus Pius)  The Severan Dynasty declared themselved "adopted posthumously" by Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius - neither of whom was in any position to object, both having been dead for decades when Septimius Severus hove upon the scene in 193.

Mark 

Venetian Soldino issued by Doge Michele Steno (1400-1413).
Obv: MICHAEL STEN' DVX (Michele Steno, Doge). Doge standing left, holding standard.
Rev: S MARCVS VENETI (Saint Mark of Venice). Winged and nimbate lion of Saint Mark facing.

Doge standing left, holding banner, * / m in right field

Georgian period nut crackers

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross penny

Obv HENRICVS REX

Obv /NNE/WEC/ - Moneyer Roger of Newcastle mint

1559 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver sixpence
16thC Tudor seal spoon handle

A copper-alloy mount of probable 17th century date. The mount takes the form of an elongated heart-shaped plate

Chronology

Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Period from: POST MEDIEVAL Date from: Circa AD 1600
Date to: Circa AD 1700

 

1st to 4thC Roman decorated gold ring with green stone - reported to Colchster museum as treasure

20.01mm,1.43g

 

Lots of early decorated crotal bells turning up

 

1610 James 1st coinweight - Crown XI S - Angel gold coin
17thC decorated gilded ring
Medieval gilded harness pendant

1369-1377 Edward III hammered silver penny - Post Treaty

 

Satire before EBO, quatrefoil on reverse cross

Rev EDWARDVS REX

Rev CIVI/TAS/EBO/RACI - York mint

1547-51 Henry VIII hammered silver groat - posthumous issue
17thC silver clothing fastner - raise heart design - reported as treasure to museum
2ndC Roman fibular brooch
15thC casket key
1500-1650 buckle
Roman mount
1500-1650 buckle
20thC Midland Railway button

First one of this type we have ever found - used as a halfpenny

Obv Rose

1554 Mary hammered silver 'Base' penny

Georgian watch winder
19thC livery button
Superb 16th/17thC lead drinking vessel handle - bearded face motif

17thC mount

Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Period from: POST MEDIEVAL Date from: Circa AD 1600
Date to: Circa AD 1700

1544-7 Henry VIII hammered silver groat - Third coinage
1634 Charles 1st hammered copper rose farthing
15thC cockeral type barrel tap key - Hand foundary mark
19thC livery button
20thC Royal Hertfordshire regiment cap badge

Roman copper alloy pelta-shaped mount. It is semi-circular.

Broad period: ROMAN
Period from: ROMAN

Date from: AD 40
Date to: AD 400

1500-1700 mount
1940 George V milled silver sixpence
850Bc Bronze scoketed axe fragment
1816 George III milled silver sixpence

1770's coinweight - 12 pence (1 shilling)

Obv & Rev D XII

1285/6 Edward 1st hammered silver farthing - new issue inner circle both sides - Type 28 Oval flan

Rev EDWARDVS REX

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

11.41mm,0.32g

1550-1700 buckle
Georgian watch winder

1216 Henry III hammered silver short cross penny -Class 6c1

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev **CA:SIM** - Simon of Canterbury mint

1603 Irish James 1st hammered silver sixpence
20thC Readers digest token
1572 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver sixpence
1912 George V milled silver sixpence

13thC Medieval gold ring bezel with black sapphire - reported as treasure to museum

1.05g,11.13mm

16th/17thC decorated gold ring - reported as treasure to museum

4.00g, 22.11mm

Silver thimble - Birmingham hall mark - not checked books for date letter yet

Maker JS - James Swan

Hoard of 20thC Girl guides badges

Big Roman AS coin - sent for ID

There's not quite enough legend present to give you "chapter and verse" on this one, but it's Marcus Aurelius - 161-180 AD - and the reverse type is Aequitas holding a set of scales and cornucopiae. Chances are the reverse legend is a typical Antonine laundry-list of titles, TR P, IMP and COS year notations.
Aequitas was one of the stable of "big", stock, allegorical personifications who could and did appear on just about anyone's coinage, like Pax, Pietas, Spes or Salus without needing to be named.

Mark

1897 Victoria milled silver sixpence

Great find 2 mid 4thC Roman barbarous radiate coins stuck togther

 
2 coins fused together makes it sound as though there must have been a (cracked or broken) pot or (organic material) purse or bag which although it didn't keep water out, more or less held the coins in place until fairly recently - it takes a while for the diagenesis process to fuse coins together.  This could be why you're getting a bunch of radiate copies - a somewhat substantial group which was only scattered relatively recently.  At any rate, it seems you're digging a mid-late 3rd century horizon at the moment or an area through which a plow-pass scattered a significant number of similar pieces.
 
The coin which is facing the camera in your photo of the "twofer" looks as though it might be an official piece from one of the later Gallic emperors, probably Tetricus I - I think I can read [IM] P C TET [RICVS...] and the quality of the engraving doesn't seem like the typical crude work of the contemporary copies.  I believe that these and their copies circulated side-by-side for at least a part of the time during which they were current, the copies making up for a shortfall of official coin, even from the "local" Gallic Empire.  Since you very seldom (if ever, so far as I remember) find coins of the "interim" Roman emperors like Aurelian and Probus whose coins are so common on the continent, that was evidently a time during which the British Isles, Brittany and Northern Europe in general was experiencing a vacuum of interaction with the Roman Central Authority, including the supply of coin.
 
Mark

 

1788 George III spade half guinea gaming token

Obv For the glory of the good old days

19thC livery button
Medieval buckle

1783 style hallmark - 18thC silver clog fastener

Maker RH - Robert Hennell London

Georgian watch winder
18thC toy cannon
1928 George V milled silver sixpence
1566 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat
1582 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver sixpence
19thC livery button
19thC Georgian Royal Engineers button
Georgian buckle
19thC livery button

19thC livery button
20thC Great Eastern railways button
15thC open topped thimble
1790 Royal artillery button
Victorian harness mount
1500-1700 mount
c16thC Gold Ryal brass single sided coin weight - rose on ship is for Ryal - R in the field indicates weight for a Rose Noble or Ryal

4thC Barbarous radiate Roman bronze - sent for ID

This appears to be a "garden variety" mid-later 3rd century contemporary local copy - the sort of thing which is liable to be referred to (although I hate the term) as a so-called "barbarous radiate".  It's stylistically very interesting in that the stick-figure reverse device is built up out of almost all straight lines and angles, where these generally tend to be made up of curvy or loopy, freehand-engraved lines. I'm going to guess - although with the right hand and the attribute it's holding off-flan it's only a guess - that this is meant to be a representation of PAX - which is by far the most common reverse type for these.  Spes and Salus are both fairly popular as well, but neither holds a scepter.
 
2 coins fused together makes it sound as though there must have been a (cracked or broken) pot or (organic material) purse or bag which although it didn't keep water out, more or less held the coins in place until fairly recently - it takes a while for the diagenesis process to fuse coins together.  This could be why you're getting a bunch of radiate copies - a somewhat substantial group which was only scattered relatively recently.  At any rate, it seems you're digging a mid-late 3rd century horizon at the moment or an area through which a plow-pass scattered a significant number of similar pieces.
 
The coin which is facing the camera in your photo of the "twofer" looks as though it might be an official piece from one of the later Gallic emperors, probably Tetricus I - I think I can read [IM] P C TET [RICVS...] and the quality of the engraving doesn't seem like the typical crude work of the contemporary copies.  I believe that these and their copies circulated side-by-side for at least a part of the time during which they were current, the copies making up for a shortfall of official coin, even from the "local" Gallic Empire.  Since you very seldom (if ever, so far as I remember) find coins of the "interim" Roman emperors like Aurelian and Probus whose coins are so common on the continent, that was evidently a time during which the British Isles, Brittany and Northern Europe in general was experiencing a vacuum of interaction with the Roman Central Authority, including the supply of coin.
 
Mark

 

17thc sword hanger
Roman lead token

55th Regiment of foot

( Westmoreland )
O/R's - 1855-1881

 

Medieval buckle
C10thC Saxon harness cheek piece
1500-1650 buckle
1652, 8 Maravedis revalidated with VIII counterstamp on 8 Maravedis of 1625 of uncertain mint, Felipe IV (1621-1665) of Spain
Georgian buckle
Georgian buckle
Royal fuseliers cap badge
1500-1650 buckle
Georgian jews harp
17thC decorated copper ring
Roman hanging pendant
Roman buckle tongue

1637- 1642 Scottish Charles 1st machine made forty pence silver coin - Briot's issue- XL by bust

Obv CAR.DG.SCOT.ANG.FR.ET.HIB.REX

Rev SALUS REIPVIBLICE SUPREMA LEX - Crown over thistle

1681 Charles II milled silver 2 pence

Taco'd 1279 Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1697 William III milled silver sixpence

1279-1284 Irish Edward Ist hammered silver penny

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUB/LINE -City of Dublin

1834 William IV milled silver sixpence
1916 George V millled silver half crown (30 pence)
1937 George V millled silver shilling (12 pence)
1572 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat
Taco'd 1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross penny
1656 John Lamb of Colchester Essex hammered copper trade farthing
Post medeival lead cloth seal

1341 Edward III hammered silver penny

Obv ED*** DNS HYB

Quatrefoil with pellet at centre of reverse cross -York Archiepiscopal issue

Rev CIVI/TAS/EBO/RACI

1554 Mary hammered silver groat
Huge East India Company lead seal
1778 Dutch Zeelandia copper coin

Medieval hanging pendant - some red enameling remains
Medieval mount
Georgian spur parts
18thC silver Navy button
Continental navy button

15thC lead token - type 2
19thC livery button
2ndC Roman fibular brooch

Eastern uninscribed Celtic gold qtr stater of Dubnovellaunos, c 20 BC

12.25mm,1.3g

Stunning 13thC Heraldic shield pendant - Blue enamelled bird with red feathers

(1501-1521).
Venetian Soldino hammered silver coin

Rev: LAVS TIBI SOLI (Thee Alone be Praised). Haloed figure of Christ holding a cross.

Obv: LE LAV DVX S M V (Leonardo Lauredan, Doge. St Mark of Venice.) Doge kneeling before Saint Mark.

1561 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver sixpence
Finished 'cooked' pictures of a 4thC Hosue of Constantine Roman silver coin

1216 Henry III hammered silver short cross penny - Class 7b-7c

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev +GIFFREI.ON.LVND - Moneyer Giffrei of London mint

1363-1369 Edward III hammered silver groat - Treaty series - Mint mark Cross potent - double satire stops on rev

Obv EDWARD DEI G REX ANGL DNS HYB Z AQT

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON

'Cooked' Roman coin sent for ID

1351- 1361 Edward III hammered silver groat - Pre treaty period

Std F type

Obv EDWARD DG REX ANGL Z FRANC D HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON

 

1696 William III milled silver sixpence

C10thC Saxon harness cheek piece
1500-1700 mount
Georgian watch winder
1500-1650 buckle
1500-1700 buckle
17thC lead token
13thC enamelled heraldic shield mount
19thC livery button
19thC livery button

4thC Roman barbarous radiate coin sent for ID

There's not a lot to go on, but I believe this is an Æ Antoninianus of Victorinus.  You're undoubtedly familiar with Tetricus since his coins seem quite common (and quite commonly dug, as well) in Britain.  You've sent me photos of a couple of Tetricus pieces in the last few weeks.  Victorinus was Tetricus' immediate predecessor as emperor of the Gallic Empire, 268-270 AD.

I can't really make out much on the reverse, but I suspect it's one of the "stable of standard personifications". If the raised area corresponds to shoulders of a standing figure, it could be Spes walking left holding a flower in outstretched right hand and hitching hem of skirt with her left . Or, it's possible it could be Pax holding a branch and transverse scepter.  It also might be Victory walking left holding a wreath and palm-branch.  I'd need to be able either to see a bit of legend or a little more detail on the figure to be certain which.

Victorinus is a bit scarcer, overall, than Tetricus.

Mark

Roman mount
17thc seal matrix - thistle inscription

1327 Edward III hammered silver penny

York mint - quartrefoil at centre of reverse cross

18thC Royal Artillery badge
Huge medieval lead trade weight
18thC lead palm sewing guide
Medieval finial with red enamelling remaining
20thC toy chicken
19thC Victoria and Albert medallion
Geotgian spur buckle
19thC 2nd Royal life guard regiment button
19thC JR Bedwell Colchester token - Beds and paper hanging, furniture, plates and watches
19thC livery button
20thC Sterling silver thimble
1634 Charles 1st hammered copper rose farthing
1654 Thomas Lambeof Colchester Essex hammered copper trade farthing

Superb WWI find

"They shall not pass" (French: "Ils ne passeront pas/On ne passe pas";

It was most famously used during the Battle of Verdun in World War I by French General Robert Nivelle (although some have attributed it to his commander, Philippe Pétain). It appears on propaganda posters, such as that by Maurice Neumont after the Second Battle of the Marne, which was later adopted on uniform badges by units manning the Maginot Line.

Shield shaped mount

Chronology

Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Period from: POST MEDIEVAL

Period to: POST MEDIEVAL

Date from: AD 1540
Date to: AD 1700

Medieval copper alloy belt mount

 

Chronology

Broad period: MEDIEVAL
Period from: MEDIEVAL

Date from: AD 1100
Date to: AD 1500

19thC livery button
Royal fuseliers regiment cap badge
1340 French shiled of France jetton
Medieval religious plate rim - Lombardic script
Medieval animal headed knife pommel
Generic merchant navy button
56th Regiment of Foot
( East Essex )
O/R's - 1855-1881
1582-4 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat - A mint mark
1600 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny- O mint mark

4thC Roman coin used as Saxon pendant - sent for ID

6.84g,28.86mm

Although I can't make out very much of the name on the obverse, on the basis of size and general type plus what few letters are readable, I'll guess that this is Constantius I (father of Constantine the Great) as Caesar - 293-305 AD.  He is particularly associated with Britain, BTW, dying at York in 306 after a very brief stint as Augustus.  The reverse appears to be the common GENIO POPVLI ROMANI type with the "Genius" of the Roman People standing left, sacrificing from a patera and holding a cornucopiae.  This was the more-or-less "standard" reverse type for the large-module folles of the late 3rd-early 4th centuries - although there were many other types, the "Genio's" far outnumbered any other type and were struck at all Imperial mints.

Mark 

Stunning 19thC silver brooch - no hallmarks

I wonder if this is celebrating William Wilberforce (24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833 leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade.

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross penny

Obv HENRICVS REX

Moneyer Willem of Norwich mint

Obv/LEI/ONN

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross penny

Obv HENRICVS REX

13thC Scottish hammered silver qtr penny - star in quadrant
1560-1 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny

4thC Roman coin - sent for ID

1.70g, 19.26

This one is surprisingly large (although not particularly heavy) for the genre - radiate contemporary copy.  This example is adequately far removed from official origins that the legend has been reduced to a decorative element - a meaningless border comprised primarily of "I's".  Since the portrait appears to be bearded, I'd supppose a coin of Victorinus, Tetricus I or Claudius II supplied the prototype.  The reverse figure is adequately vague that about all we can do is guess at which personification or deity may have been intended, but on the strength of the transverse scepter and the relatively sparse, widely spaced "lettering", I'd be willing to guess that PAX AVG may have been what the engraver had in mind.  The general time-frame would be approximately 270-280 AD. give or take a couple of years.

Mark

A copper-alloy mount of probable 17th century date. The mount takes the form of an elongated heart-shaped plate. Extending from the reverse are two broken integral rivets

Chronology

Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Period from: POST MEDIEVAL Date from: Circa AD 1600
Date to: Circa AD 1700

A copper-alloy mount of probable 17th century date.

Chronology

Broad period: POST MEDIEVAL
Period from: POST MEDIEVAL Date from: Circa AD 1600
Date to: Circa AD 1700

 

 

 

17th/18thC gold ring - inscription uses old style long S as a normal S - Maker Rh - no hallmarks

4.41g, 19.66mm

Inscription reads 'CONTENT IS A TREASURE'

Long style S went out of use between 1782 and 1793

'CONTENT IS A TREASURE'

An italicized long s used in the word "Congress" in the United States Bill of Rights

Reported as treasure to museum

Debased Roman silver coin straight into the 'cooker' sent for ID

2.60g, 18.83mm

This is very interesting - I'm curious to see what comes out on the obverse.  The reverse - VENVS CAELESTIS - is very clear, of course, but it's a pretty uncommon reverse type, generally only known for a couple of Imperial women around the time of Elagabalus (218-222), but associated with a few "hybrid" types, too.  I haven't been able to make the few semi-legible letters on the obverse line up with any of the legends I'd expect it to be.

An unusual find, more than likely to be scarce or rare.

Mark 

Checking against a different obverse legend than I was looking at at first, I believe now that this is the identity of your VENVS CAELESTIS

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album97/ML_05_J_Soaemias_Venus_den

Julia Soaemias, mother of Elagabalus

This is the most "commonly seen" of this unusual reverse's appearances - still a pretty scarce piece.

Mark

Roman silver coin straigth into the 'cooker' sent for ID

I'm afraid at this point I can't tell you much more than that it's a denarius of Hadrian (117-138 AD.)  Which of the many possible seated deities or personifications might be on the reverse I really can't tell at this point - although if, as I suspect, it turns out that she's holding a branch in her right hand, it's likely to be Pax.

Mark

1560-1 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny -Cross crosslet mint mark
1580-1 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny - Latin cross mint mark
1634 Scottish Charles 1st hammered silver 20 pence
1920's silver boxing medallion
1696 William III milled silver sixpence

Stunning example and the first Wales mint we have ever found

1190 -1205 King John hammered silver short cross penny of the Rhuddlan mint - Class ii

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev TOMAS.ON.RVLA - Moneyer Tomas of Rhuddlan Wales mint

Short cross coins were produced during the period 1180-1215 at this mint

1216 Henry III hammered silver short cross qtr penny

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev **ON.GI - Ipswich mint

19thC livery button
1500-1650 buckle
First decorated 1641 Civil War lead powder measure and cap I have seen - looks like a cat design
Solid silver Birmingham 1982 Hall mark - thin bezel - watch back ?
1422- 61 Bronze uniface Crowned Three lis in shield French Ecu gold coin weight 2.96g. Letters by the shield indicate French not English version. The Gold Ecu was worth 4 shillings in England

'The desire of all nations' - medallion

Peace of Amiens. THE DESIRE OF ALL NATIONS. Rev: PEACE & PLENTY OCTOBER 1 1801

1553- 86 AD Hans Schultes I ‘Lion of St Mark’ Jetton

1586 Hans Krauwincel II Rose orb Jeton

HANNS KRAVWINCKEL IN NVRENB

19thC livery button
Georgian watch winder
1920 George V milled silver 3 pence
Our 2nd 20thC Girl Guides badge hoard of the year LOL

Roman silver coin straight into the 'cooker' sent for ID - Sent off latest 'cooked' pictures to Mark

I'm afraid at this point I can't tell you much more than that it's a denarius of Hadrian (117-138 AD.)  Which of the many possible seated deities or personifications might be on the reverse I really can't tell at this point - although if, as I suspect, it turns out that she's holding a branch in her right hand, it's likely to be Pax.

Mark

Cooked Roman BC republican coin sent for ID

Debased Roman silver coin straight into the 'cooker' sent for ID

2.60g, 18.83mm

This is very interesting - I'm curious to see what comes out on the obverse.  The reverse - VENVS CAELESTIS - is very clear, of course, but it's a pretty uncommon reverse type, generally only known for a couple of Imperial women around the time of Elagabalus (218-222), but associated with a few "hybrid" types, too.  I haven't been able to make the few semi-legible letters on the obverse line up with any of the legends I'd expect it to be.

An unusual find, more than likely to be scarce or rare.

Mark 

Checking against a different obverse legend than I was looking at at first, I believe now that this is the identity of your VENVS CAELESTIS

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album97/ML_05_J_Soaemias_Venus_den

Julia Soaemias, mother of Elagabalus

This is the most "commonly seen" of this unusual reverse's appearances - still a pretty scarce piece.

Mark

Roman silver coin straight into the 'cooker' sent for ID - Sent off latest 'cooked' pictures to Mark

I'm afraid at this point I can't tell you much more than that it's a denarius of Hadrian (117-138 AD.)  Which of the many possible seated deities or personifications might be on the reverse I really can't tell at this point - although if, as I suspect, it turns out that she's holding a branch in her right hand, it's likely to be Pax.

Mark

This BC Republican silver coin has been 'cooking' since March and detail is just starting to come through. Appears to be a helmeted guys with an animal on obv- the crust on this coin is one of the hardest I have seen

 

2011 MarchII finds page

2011 March finds page

2011 Feb finds page