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2013 April finds page

70BC Morini boat tree Celtic gold qtr stater

Reported as potential hoard to museum

1.51g,10.18mm

CCI 13.0074

 

Medieval barrel spigot with cockerel type tap - similar recorded on PAS below

(c. AD 1400-1600). The key (or handle) is a two-dimensional representation of a cockerel, with a large ring and dot eye, open beak, small crest and curved tail being the only detail applied

Record ID: BERK-A3B3B5

Record ID: SOM-901263

 

1476 Edward IV hammered silver penny - Type Dudley local - Durham IM Cinquefoil

Bishop William Dudley 1476-1483

DV by bust - No D at centre of reverse cross is rare

Obv EDWARD + DI + GRA REX ANGL

 

Medieval buckle

Cooking 2ndC Roman silver coin - the obv shows how thick the crust cooking off is

Cooking 2ndC Roman silver coin - another example of how thick the crust cooking off is

As dug and cooking pictures

Penn Dennis' crispy Roman silver is start to 'cook' up after being in the pot since March 2012 !! Still more crust to remove yet but I sent it off for ID.

the obverse legend is DIVA FAVSTINA ("the deified" Faustina) and portrays her in the usual way with a fairly elaborate hairstyle, somewhat swept up in the back with a small bun at the top of the head.
The reverse legend is AVGVSTA and the figure is Ceres - the allegorical personification of the grain supply (remember bread and circuses? - this was the bread half of that formula portrayed as a demi-god) holding a torch and a scepter.  Ceres was a common reverse type for the AVGVSTA series and is potrayed with eight or ten slightly varying combinations of attributes, torches, scepters, bunches of grain-ears plus various hand gestures - raising, holding fold of drapery, etc. are paired up in many different permutations.

Faustina Sr.for him - a posthumous piece (as is the majority of her coinage) for the wifeof Antoninus Pius. She died in 141, only 3 years into Antoninus' longreign, and had significant posthumous coinages struck in her honor, first byAntoninus Pius, then later by Marcus Aurelius - her son-in-law.


Mostof Faustina Sr.'s coinage is not divided easily into date-groupsby type - the same types being issued over a fairly long period. Generally her posthumous coins by A. Pius are dated to "after 147AD." It was in 147 that her daughter, Faustina Jr, wife of M. Aurelius,assumed the title of "Augusta" and it is presumed that this was the occasion for the beginning of her posthumous coinage.

Mark

Crispy Roman silver is start to 'cook' up after being in the cooker since March 2012

As dug and 'Cooking' Roman silver - still more to do yet and then I will resent it to Mark Lehman

The details are still a bit fuzzy, but I can tell you that it's a denarius of Hadrian (117-138 AD.) and the reverse type is TELLVS STABIL. A woman - the personification of Tellus - standing left holding a plow-handle and a rake - 2 corn plants protrude from the ground behind her. This is a product of the Mint at Rome in 133 AD. The obverse reads (or should read) HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P - and if you study it closely, you can tell that it does have that legend.



Mark

As dug and 'cooking' pics - still more work to do yet

Primary Saxon silver sceat 600- 700 AD - sent to Fitzwilliam museum for recording and ID

1918 George V milled silver floin (24 pence) 1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross farthing

Four more 5thC Roman bronze coins reported to museum as hoard - when you find a 'hoard' the coins must be handed in 'as dug' condition

In the photo of the group of 4 pieces, the one on the upper left is the only one I'm reasonably certain about.  It's Constantius II (most likely, although without any visible legend there is a very small chance it might be Constans) and it's one of the ubiquitous FEL TEMP REPARATIO pieces depicting a soldier advancing to the left and spearing an unfortunately unhorsed foe

Mark

Rough 2ndC large Roman bronze - unusual pointy chin on the bust so I have sent it off to Mark Lehman to see if he can ID it

Marcus Aurelius, 139-161 (Caesar) and 161-180 (Augustus) - although this dupondius is somewhat obscured by the rough surfaces and the rays of his crown are hiding the rows of curls in his hair to a certain extent, this is an example from soon after his elevation to Augustus with a particularly pointy-chinned portrait:

Mark

1500-1700 mount Georgian mount Edward VII coronation medallion

Cast copper alloy trapezoidal shoe or knee buckle with concave sides

1660-1720

1895 Victoria milled silver sixpence Georgian fob seal
1846 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1413- 22 Henry V hammered silver farthing - Type 7 - early hair type

Broken annulet right and pellet left either side of crown

Obv + HENRICxREXxANGL

Rev CIV/TAS/LON/DON- London mint

What great find 1873 Birmingham solid silver pill box with 2 - 1870 continental coins inside
Medieval copper bale seal 16thC Tudor fretwork button

Another 4thC hoard coin sent for ID and reported to museum

"CONSTANTINOPOLIS" - One the so-called "City Commemorative" Centenionales issued in the names of Rome and Constantinople dating to the time of Constantine I moving to the newly-fortified Constantinople as his capital - c. 330-337- these are contemporary with the very common "GLORIA EXERCITVS types with two soldiers standing flanking either two or one legionary standard.  The obverse is an allegorical personification of Constantinople as a helmeted and mantled female with a spear held over her shoulder.  The reverse is anepigraphic (except for exergual mint marks) and shows Victory standing left in the prow of a galley holding a spear and resting on a shield.  The mint mark is off-flan on this specimen, although the style is European - as opposed to the style at the Asian mints.
a complete specimen from the mint at Trier (a likely origin for yours) would look like this:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album165/58_Cpls_TRE_b

Mark

This is a fascinating example of a worn die 70BC Morini Celtic gold qtr stater or is it another very rare North Thames type based on Gallo-Belgic D Boat Tree quarters

Reported as potential hoard to museum and sent to CCI for recording

 

1.45g 10.83mm

The Boat Tree quarter with Y reverse is a scarce early variant of the normal Gallic War type, probably dating from the early 50s BC; it isn't in ABC but should probably be listed as a separate type in a future edition. 

John

CCI 13.0075

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

"DIVO CLAVDIO" - Posthumous commemorative antoninianus for Claudius Gothicus struck c. 270 by his brother Quintillus and/or Aurelian at the beginning of his reign.  Also this type is one of the most widely copied prototypes in the manufacture of so-called "Barbarous Radiates", the contemporary copies produced as emergency currency during times when there was no regular re-supply of regal coin from Rome - ie: during the later Gallic Empire, during the revolt of Carausius/Allectus, and as the Romans finally withdrew their administration first from Britain, then from Gaul in the 5th century.

I'm not certain what the reverse type is on this one, although the legend will almost invariably be the same on all of these - CONSECRATIO - The most common types are an eagle standing, facing, head either to right or left (which is probably the most likely type for this piece to be - see below) or the paneled facade of an altar with flames and horns showing above.  

1586 Hans Krauwincel II Rose orb Jetton

HANNS KRAVWINCKEL IN NVRENB

Bush tractor plate 1926 George V milled silver India 10 cents
1844 Victoria milled silver sixpence 17thC lead trade token

Cast copper alloy trapezoidal shoe or knee buckle with concave sides

1660-1720

1272 Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Obv EDWAR R ANGL *****

Rev CIV/TAS/LON/DON- London mint

15thC lead token - type 2 Britannia badge

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording & reported as potential hoard to museum

17.54mm,5.50g

CCI 13.0076.

17thC Charles II silver button reported to museum as treasure

Huge silver 'Hunter' sized pocket fob watch dated 1879

London mint - maker JJ

Another 3 Roman 4thC coins from the existing hoard area - report to museum as hoard - sent to Mark Lehman for his views

There's really not a lot for me to work with here.  The only one I could comment upon with any confidence is the one with the fairly clear portrait.  If I'm reading the surviving letters of the legend correctly, it would make this likely to be either Constans or Valens - each commonly breaks their obverse legend before the terminal "S " in their name - like this: (VALEN - S or CONSTAN - S) "... - S P F AVG".

If it's Constans, chances are it's either a single-standard Gloria Exercitvs or a fallen horseman Fel Temp.  If it's Valens, it's about a 50-50 chance of being a GLORIA ROMANORVM with emperor dragging captive and carrying a labarum or SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE with Victory walking left carrying wreath and palm.

Taking a 2nd look at the reverse of the one with the visible portrait and rotating it about 135º clockwise, I believe I see one of two standing soldiers (the one on the right) who would be flanking the single standard on a Gloria Exercitvs of Constans as Augustus.

The piece which is most round - upper right - seems to show evidence of a small circle on the reverse which might be a wreath held by one of two Victories facing each other holding wreaths on a VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN - (rotate it 45º counter-clockwise, the Victory is on the left holding the wreath out at chest level) These were the final incarnation of the Centenionalis before it was scrapped in 348 and the FEL TEMP - Majorina-based coinage was introduced.  Those were struck only by Constans and by Constantius II, but are otherwise identical except for the names in the obverse legends.  These were struck only in the years 347-348 so if that's what it turns out to be, it's closely datable despite perhaps not being attributable to any specific ruler.

The one with a bite taken out of it really has no distinguishing features clear enough to make any sort of firm guess, but in rotating the reverse, I think I might have seen it as a FEL TEMP fallen horseman type. - However, since that is the most common single type of coin surviving from antiquity, it's always a pretty safe guess when there are no clear features from which to ID it as something else.

Mark 

1897 Victoria diamond jubilee medallion 19thC livery button 15thC lead token

Stunning condition 1778 Russian lead bale seal

N.P is Unprovenanced

 

1770 Russian lead bale seal

W.K. is Unprovenanced

Huge 17thC working toy petronel (pistol)

1500-1700 mount WWII RAF button Victoria Royal Engineers button

Roman period mount Roman lynch pin
Roman period mount

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Rev /ON/LV - London mint

1634 Charles 1st hammered silver penny 1560-1 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Rev /*LE/OH - Nicole of Canterbury mint

17thC Dutch lead bale seal
Georgian pill box lid Georgian watch winders

1797-1813 gold 1/3 guinea coin weight

Obv 7S

WWII Navy button 19thC livery button Victorian silver locket
1500-1700 mount 19thC livery button

1750-1770 20 Real Joseph I Portuguese silver coin

17thC gilded silver clothing fastener - reported as treasure to museum
1stC Roman head stud type fibular brooch 1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross farthing

 

50 BC Clacton type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording and reported as potential hoard to museum

This example clearly shows the gold, copper, silver mix of these coins

13.62,1.33g

1561 -5 Elizabeth hammered silver three pence - Pheon mint mark 18thC Royal Navy silver button 17thC lead token

4th C Roman bronze coin sent for ID

Although I rotated the reverse image through an entire 360º searching for some telltale familiar shape that might allow me to categorize and date this piece more closely, I was unable to come up with any determination that satisfied me.  The obverse, however, has just enough detail showing in the legend that I can tell you with a reasonable degree of certainty that I believe this to be a reduced follis or centenionalis of Constantine I (307-337).  He introduced the centenionalis to replace the sadly diminished Diocletianic follis - reduced to a mere shadow if its original module - in about 319.  Licinius, being Constantine's perpetual antagonist at the time, continued to mint folles at the mints he controlled in the East until his ultimate defeat and death in 324.  Ironically, the two denominations are so similar in size and weight that most folks don't realize there's any difference between Licinius' last folles and Constantine's earliest centenionales.  At any rate, I'd guess that this piece, whatever the reverse type may turn out to be, would probably date to the late teens on through the twenties of the 3rd century.

Mark

1649 Commonwealth hammered silver penny Georgian watch winders
15thC Spanish 8 real 17thC crotal bell

Cleaned up Saxon rope necklace end - single rivet fixing

Beast with large bottom jaw, large nose, recessed eyes with his head resting on his paw left - rear shows curled up spiralled tail.

Rope necklace is still embedded in end

Cleaned up crusty 13thC vessica seal matrix - sacrificial lamb type

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

What you need to do is rotate the image of the reverse about 165º clockwise and you'll see it looks like this with a pair of wreaths between a pair of heads which face inward:

What we have on the reverse of this "Æ4" is a pair of Victories facing each other, each one holding up a wreath (we've had kids in the ACE program who insisted they saw "angels playing badminton" on these) This type was part of the very final issue of the Constantinian Centenionalis (introduced by Constantine I in about 319)  these final-issue Centenionales date to 346-7, just before Constans and Constantius II introduced the reformed, Majorina-based coinage, the most comonly seen examples of which are the FEL TEMP REPARATIO types - and the most common of those types is the soldier spearing the unfortunate fallen horseman.

This type, however, is VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN - ("[to] the Victories of our two Emperors") Two Victories holding wreaths - This type was struck only by Constans, who was not long for the world at this point - he was killed in 350 by Magnentius in Hispania - and Constantius II who, as sole ruler of the Roman world, would issue all those soldier-and-horseman pieces for the next 13 years. 

(You might recall a hoard of Æ3's you had last year with a bare-headed emperor's portrait, and the haircut that looks like a classic greaser's "DA" - interestingly, the most common reverse of Magnentius and his brother Decentius is a somewhat different 2-Victories reverse type - http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album167/29_Magnentius_2VIC_TRP  )

A more completely visible Constantius specimen would look like this:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album166/Cs_II_VICT_DD_AVGG_Q

and a Constans looks like this:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album166/15_Constans_2Vic_TRE

So you should be able to see why, if none of the obverse legend is legible, it's not really possible to tell which one of the two is on a particular coin. 
Based on what might be the serifs of letters between about 1:00 & 3:00 on your piece's obverse, yours seems somewhat more likely to be Constantius II than Constans. It really matters little whether you have Constans or Constantius however - their coins of this type are exactly the same except for the presence or absence of:  "...TIV..."  towards the end of the name in the obverse legend.

I can tell you however, despite the lack of legible exergual mint mark on your piece, on the basis of the M visible in the lower field between the 2 Victories that it's most likely to be from the mint of Trier.  Lugdunum also used an M in the field, but on a single very rare issue of these, so Trier is by far the more probable place of origin.

Mark

1586 Hans Krauwincel II Rose orb Jetton

HANNS KRAVWINCKEL IN NVRENB

1641-3 Charles 1st hammered silver penny - mintmark 2 dots

 

1649 Commonwealth hammed silver half groat 17thC lead token 17thC lead token

Georgian pewter domino 16thC S buckle
Medieval lead trade weight Victorian silver fob chain bar

1250-1500 D buckle

Post-medieval copper-alloy buckle frame

C AD 1650-1720

1720-1790 Boot or Garter buckles

Post Medieval cast copper alloy single loop buckle frame.

1500-1650 AD

16thC Tudor button 18thC flint lock pistol handle plate
1928 George V milled silver sixpence 18thC silver mount

 

1215 Henry III hammered silver half penny

 

1565 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat -= Rose mint mark
1625-42 Charles 1st hammered silver half penny - Rose each side
1942 George VI milled silver shilling (12 pence)
Eastern Counties bus company 15thC lead token 1817 George III milled silver sixpence
Eastern National bus company 18thC 29th Regiment of foot button

1300-10 Edward 1st hammered silver farthing - type 28d

Obv EDWARDVS REX A

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

Large C8thC Saxon mount

Monster rare coin ID'd Frisian imitation (c.830-850)

Wierd ancient coin - looks like a Roman but with more medieval style lettering - sent off to both medieval and Roman experts for their views

This is copper alloy plated imitation of a Frisian imitation (c.830-850) of the gold solidus of Louis the Pious (814-840). There have been many single finds of these Frisian imitations, including cut fractions of them, but this is the first plated copy I have seen.

I have recorded this as EMC 2013.0106. If it should ever be available to acquire please let us know.

Best wishes,

Martin

 

   

Date: Medieval, 1200-1400 AD.

Description: A complete silver annular brooch dating to the Medieval period. The frame is circular in section and in plan. The pin, also silver, is rectangular in section and bent around the frame to form an attachment loop of almost a complete circle. The shaft of the pin extends away from the loop, becoming circular in section and tapering to a blunt point. The pin has suffered some damage and bent in the centre of the shaft whilst the attachment loop has been bent to one side. This could have occurred during use. The object is classified as a buckle rather than a brooch as there is no constriction for the pin. Several similar examples have been recorded through the Treasure process on the PAS database (e.g. IOW-D6F125 / 2009 T106 and SWYOR-9EF3B5 / 2010 T820).

The frame measures 18.5mm in diameter and 1.9mm in thickness. The pin measures 20.7mm in length and 1.6mm in width at the centre of the shaft. The brooch weighs 1.74g.

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin type

Obv EDWR ANGL DNS YB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR- Canterbury mint

1604 James 1st hammered silver half groat
Medieval nut cracker arm with face decoration

A complete cast copper alloy buckle of post-medieval date. The buckle is a double loop asymmetrical shape

Circa 1575- 1700

18thC toy cannon

Post Medieval cast copper alloy single loop buckle frame.

1500-1650 AD

1696 William III milled silver sixpence 1696 William III milled silver sixpence - love token
1554 Mary hammered silver groat 1844 Victoria milled silver sixpence

Post-medieval copper-alloy buckle frame

C AD 1650-1720

Georgian watch winders Victorian whistle
18thC clog fastener 17thC lead token Roman bronze mount

Post Medieval cast copper alloy single loop buckle frame.

1500-1650 AD

Georgian watch winder 1740's issue George II milled silver shilling (12 pence) Old bust, roses
1stC Celtic enamelled triskele disc brooch - Ref Hattatt 525 Page 143, Crummy, N1983, PL.14.82

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

1.97g, 16.82mm

Im not 100% sure about the reverse type, as deeply encrusted as it is, but I can read the obverse adequately to say the emperor is Constans - one of Constantine I's sons - 337-350 AD.
I think it might be one of the 2 Victories holding wreaths type late centenionales - the size is right for that:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album166/15_Constans_2Vic_TRE

Mark

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

1.44g, 15.64mm – Bronze  1

This appears to be a contemporary copy of a "Quinarius" - a smaller-size radiate, presumably valued as half the antoninianus -  of British emperor Allectus - with the galley reverse - like this (except yours is unoffical and the legend is blundered, etc) or it could just be a very crude official piece:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album85/ML_09_Allectus_Virtus_ant2

Mark

1496- 1504 Henry VII hammered silver half groat - Tun mint mark - Double arched crown

Obv HENRIC DI GRA

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1509 Henry VIII trade weight - Crown h cipher - unusual flat design
Very unusual double sided type 2 medieval lead token Downing of Manningtree and Clacton on Sea advertising watch winder

 

Medieval badges Ref Mitchiner p244 939 - 941

'A badge for a Knight of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre in bronze and dating somewhere around C13/14th possibly very slightly later . This is a very scarce item and it relates to The Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem being a Catholic chivalric order of Knighthood that traces its roots to Godfrey of Bouillon, principal leader of the First Crusade. According to reliable sources in the Vatican and Jerusalem, it began in historical reality as a mixed clerical and lay confraternity (association) of pilgrims which gradually grew around the most central of the Christian holy places in the Middle East, the Holy Sepulchre or the tomb of Jesus Christ.This would have been a pin for a member of the order , there is a mark on the reverse where the original pin would have been fixed '

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

1.99g, 15.39mm

This is a little later than what you seem to usually find.  It's a SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE Æ3.  These were struck for about 6 different emperors in the Valentinian dynasty, but are overwhelmingly more common for the first 2 - Valentinian I and Valens.  I can't tell which of the 2 this is:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album82/A_13_SisVi_SecReip1

Mark

1stC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

15.71g, 29.29mm

This one I can't be 100% certain about, but from the size and weight, it's a sestertius.  I believe, since the bust appears to be bare-headed and Caesars were portratyed bare-headed in the 3rd century, that this is Marcus Aurelius as Caesar under Antoninus Pius, 139-161.  I don't know what the reverse is - it seems to be a seated figure left.  Usually the seated figures are female, but this somehow looks male so it might be Zeus who is commmonly portrayed seated to the left. If it's a standing figure, it might be Virtus - a popular subject for Caesars' large bronzes:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album94/M_Aurel_Caes_Virtvs_Sest1

Mark

 

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

2.84g ,20.57mm

You have had surprisingly few coins of the British Empire over the years - this lot contains at least 3 - this is the 2nd.  It's Carausius, 287-293, and I'm pretty sure the reverse is the typical PAX AVG like this:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album85/ML_03_Carausius_Max_Pax_ant2

Mark

 

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

This, I believe, is another VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN - 2 Victories facing each other and holding wreaths.  It wold be either Constans or Constantius II, these were issued only in the years 346-7.

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album166/16_Constantius_2Vic_ROM

Mark

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

1.20g, 13.69mm

This is Valens, 364-378, another SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE like # 5 - we can almost make out the mint mark, but not quite, although I think it's an Eastern mint by the format: SMXX

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album82/A_26_ConVn_SecReip

Mark

1stC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

19.53g, 30.91mm

This is a Sesterius of Marcus Aurelius, 161-180 (I believe it is - it might be his co-emperor Lucius Verus), in honor of one of his victories - the reverse is Victory standing right hanging a shield inscribed "VIC / PAR" or "VIC GERM" etc on a palm tree.
This is the same type in a sestertius of his co-emperor Lucius Verus - typically the same types were struck for both of them, Verus died in 169 and no one much missed him:

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album96/ML03_Verus_Vic_Par_sest?full=1

Mark

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

3.83g, 21.37mm

This is the 2nd Carausius (3rd British Empire piece)  It's most likely PAX AVG again - that's by far the most common reverse type, but there's a slight chance this is Victory standing left.

http://www.stoa.org/gallery/album85/ML_06_Carausius_Fortuna_ant

Mark

Infanterie de ligne (1871-1916)
Musket ram rod guide

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

0.61g, 11.55mm

This is one of the 2 Victories facing each other holding wreaths type - VICTORIAE DD AVG Q NN - the final emission of the Centenionalis denomination, struck only for Constantius II and Constans in 346/347 - the obverse is too far gone to tell which of the two it is.  This one has a symbol between the Victories - an ivy leaf on a stem. This symbol was only used in Trier and Rome.  Given the normal sourcing for those coins you dig which show an identifiable mint mark, I'd have to say Trier is the more likely of the two

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

1.14g, 15.5mm

This one I'm not 100% certain about - again, no legend at all is a serious handicap to attribution.
However, I'm just about as positive as I can be from a portrait of this era on its own merits, this is Claudius Gothicus, 268-270.
Since, unless it's all shovel-marks, this appears to be at least a vaguely rectilinear shape on the reverse, and Gothicus' posthumous radiates with a large square altar on the reverse are one of the more common types of both official issue and contemporary copy, I'd say that's what this is most likely to be - either an official or contemporary copy of, "CONSECRATIO. paneled facade of large enclosure for altar with fire atop it and horns at the corners."
This is only a guess, but Gothicus didn't have much else with straight lines on the reverse

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

1.52g, 13.86mm

For this one, at first I was going to say: "I'm pretty certain this is not a Roman coin - I can't find any recognizeable features, I've turned and turned it and I can't make the either side resolve into anything clearly recognizeable, despite a lot of bold detail."
Then I came back and looked at the reverse again. Now I realize it's probably a crude contemporary copy of the same type as the next -a very easily recognizeable piece - FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman.
Contemporary copies of this type aren't at all unusual - this was a very common type in circulation before the Romans began pulling out of Britain and so it was a natural prototype for local copyists as localities began producing their own "emergency coinages" and before truly local types evolved - I guess folks still hoped the Romans would be returning at this point.  The level of crudeness was what was throwing me off.

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

1.75g,, 16.69mm

This is what is referred to as a "Campgate" - although it's highly unlikely that the gate of an army camp was what was meant to be portrayed.
A city gate perhaps, or a mile-castle on a fortified border - a signal tower in other words - with a pair of brazier-looking "turrets" which are probably meant to be part of the signalling apparatus.
There isn't enough here to tell you who or where it's from.  We have a left-facing helmeted bust which could be just about anyone in the Constantine or Licinius clans.  Chances are the reverse legend is PROVIDENTIAE AVGG (for an emperor's, CAESS for a Caesar's coin)
The exergue is not completely off-flan, bu there isn't enough native contrast in the image for me to make it legible with the tweaks at my command.  These date mainly to the period 324-328, although there were a couple earlier issues of similar "architectural"-reverse Æ's, some with a different legend (VIRTVS AVG/CAES) and/or with an earlier representation of the "gate" which usually has more than 2 turrets in the earlier (3-teens) representation.  This is almost certainly the later and far more common type.

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

3.59, 20.69mm

This is a larger piece - a Majorina - of the Western semi-rebel emperor Magnentius who, with his younger brother Decentius, was around for a couple years - 350-353.  This is yet another sort of 2 Victories reverse.  This is somewhat like the VICTORIAE LAETAE's of Constantine's a generation earlier.  The legend here is VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAE and the 2 Victories are holding a wreath enclosing VOT / V / MVLT / X .
I'm afraid I can't be certain of the location of the mint from what little is visible in the exergue - but if the round shape is the top of a Q in the middle of the mint mark, this would be from the mint at Aquilea: AQP, AQS, AQT etc.

Georgian button Medieval buckle handle mount

Medieval decorated strap end
 
Georgian candle holder  

1346-1361 Edward III gold half noble - Closed E at centre of cross - satire stops

Needs straightening for a confirmed ID

4.12g

Saxon gold ingot - reported as treasure to museum

3.21g, 8.43mm dia

Broken Celtic gold full stater - not checked the ref books yet

Sent to CCI for recording

1.68g, 13.74mm

The broken stater can be 13.0083.  By coincidence I was looking at these yesterday, it's a Dubnovellaunos in Essex stater, ABC 2392, BMC 2425-2440, Van Arsdell 1650; there should be just enough of the legend showing to be able to die link the reverse.  It's not a particularly rare type, over 100 in the Index at present.  Hope the rest turns up, it's not unknown for different fragments of the same coin to turn up years apart!

All the best

John

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

This one is very easy.  Constantius II, the type is FEL TEMP REPARATIO - soldier advancing left and spearing fallen horseman.  The mint is Lugdunum (Lyons) - I'll even hazard a catalog reference - RIC VIII, Lyons 189 or 196, 6 November 355 - Spring 360. The mint mark is either GPLG or RPLG, respectively for the 2 numbers cited.

Facinating unknown 1335 Edward III hammered silver penny- this does not match either transitional period or class 15d so it could be one of the unknown 2nd coinage 1335 -1343 issues

New legend for a Durham mint as it should be either DOR/ELME or DVN/ELMI but this is clearly DVN/ELME

Obv EDWAR ANGLE DNS ***

Rev CIVI/TAS/DVN/ELME -Durham mint

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross penny

Obv - HENRICVS REX

Rev *VD/ONL/VN* - Moneyer Renavd of London mint

 

1216 Henry III hammered silver short cross half penny

Obv - HENRICVS REX

Rev Moneyer Wiilem of Canterbury mint

Roman fibular brooch - similar to a 3rdC cross bow brooch without the cross - no obvious matches in Hattatt so one for the museum

4thC Roman bronze coin sent for ID

This is a VICTORIAE LAETAE PRINC PERP type - 2 Victories facing each other and holding a shield inscribed VOT / PR above a small altar with a symbol - a cross within a wreath - on the altar.  This symbol was used only at the London mint.

These were struck for all the members of the families of Constantine I & Licinius around 319 - they are part of the first emission of the Centenionalis denomination which would be ushered-out by the VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN's the type with 2 Victories holding wreaths, of 346 & 347, the final examples of the sadly shrunken and debased denomination.
I'm, afraid I can't make out quite enough of the obverse legend to know to whom we should give this, but Constantine I and his 2 sons, Crispus and Constantine II, Caesars are the most likely suspects - particularly at the mint of London.

 

Mark

18thc silver Royal Navy button

Bronze Age (c.1500-1400BC) cast copper alloy primary shield pattern palstave, dating to the Acton Park Phase

68.25mm L x 29.97

734g

10-40AD Cunobelin Celtic bronze unit

Obv Janus head below CVNO, inside quad.o,pellet border

Rev boar std,below CAMV,inside quad.o,pellet border

1.52g,13.88mm

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross penny

Obv - HENRICVS REX

Rev /NDE/IDO/ - Moneyer David of London mint

1486 - 1504 Henry VII hammered silver half groat - one plain and one jeweled arch to crown - im Cross pattee - im Obv Tun

Obv HENRICVS.DI.GRA. REX AGL Z R

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

Roman bronze miniature votive offering pot

21.83mm h x 21.84mm w, 7.04g

Huge 3 inch diameter Arabic looking medallion ?
Georgian vesta case Duke Of Cornwall Light Infantry Regiment
1853 Victoria milled silver sixpence 1863 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1641-3 Charles 1st hammered silver penny - mintmark 2 dots

2 - Georgian jewelry items

Different design of a medieval bronze pot foot Low grade gold ingot
 
Continental Navy button Essex Constabulary button  

 

Biggest 11,000 BC flint axe head I have ever seen - it is a monster and weighs 580g, 220mm L x 54.6 mm W

Mid 4thC Roman Constantine bronze coin

Shewolf & Twins reverse which is typically found on the VRBS ROMA, City of Rome commemorative, reduced-module folles introduced around 330 AD.,

1667 John Sewell, grocer of Colchester Essex hammered copper trade farthing

Middle Bronze age 850 BC socketed bronze axe head

49.8mm w x 38.9mm L

Penn Dennis' crispy Roman silver is start to 'cook' up after being in the pot since March 2012 !! Finally finished

the obverse legend is DIVA FAVSTINA ("the deified" Faustina) and portrays her in the usual way with a fairly elaborate hairstyle, somewhat swept up in the back with a small bun at the top of the head.
The reverse legend is AVGVSTA and the figure is Ceres - the allegorical personification of the grain supply (remember bread and circuses? - this was the bread half of that formula portrayed as a demi-god) holding a torch and a scepter.  Ceres was a common reverse type for the AVGVSTA series and is potrayed with eight or ten slightly varying combinations of attributes, torches, scepters, bunches of grain-ears plus various hand gestures - raising, holding fold of drapery, etc. are paired up in many different permutations.

Faustina Sr.for him - a posthumous piece (as is the majority of her coinage) for the wifeof Antoninus Pius. She died in 141, only 3 years into Antoninus' longreign, and had significant posthumous coinages struck in her honor, first byAntoninus Pius, then later by Marcus Aurelius - her son-in-law.


Mostof Faustina Sr.'s coinage is not divided easily into date-groupsby type - the same types being issued over a fairly long period. Generally her posthumous coins by A. Pius are dated to "after 147AD." It was in 147 that her daughter, Faustina Jr, wife of M. Aurelius,assumed the title of "Augusta" and it is presumed that this was the occasion for the beginning of her posthumous coinage.

Mark

The 'cooking' process clearly shows the thickness of the horn crust on this coin

10- 40 AD Cunobelinus 'Sitting Griffin' type silver unit - Classed as extremely rare VA 2051, BMC 1868-9 Chris Rudd 30.73

Cooking to clean up and sent to CCI for recording and confirmed ID

Rev CVNO in tablet, wrealth border

Obv Griffin r - on tablet containing CAMV

I've done a card for the Sitting Griffin unit and it's now CCI 12.0835; I've used the photo you sent but will replace it with a better one when the coin's 'cooked'!

 

All the best

John

Mega crisp 1816 George III milled silver shilling (12 pence)

Victorian 5 shillings Insurance reward tag - Glosgow

19 Newton Place, Charing Cross Rd Glasgow

Victorian silver bird mount 17thC lead token

Medieval copper alloy belt mount

Date from: AD 1100
Date to: AD 1500

Georgian watch winders 1639-40 Charles 1st hammered silver half groat - Triangle mint mark
19thC livery button Georgian button
17thC Thomas Reynolds bays maker of Colchester hammered copper farthing - undated type
19thC livery button

Georgian Royal Engineers button

Crown GR

1272 Edward 1st hammered silver penny - Class 3

Obv EDWR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev BR/ISTO/LL** - Bristol mint

1835 William IV milled silver sixpence 1895 Victoria milled silver sixpence
1846 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1586 Hans Krauwincel II Rose orb Jetjon

HANNS KRAVWINCKEL IN NVRENB

1943 George VI milled silver shilling

1369- 1377 Edward III hammered silver penny - Post Treaty

Obv *** ANC

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin type

Obv EDWR ANGL DN ***

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1578-9 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny - mint mark Greek cross
1554 Mary hammered silver groat 16thC Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat
Taco'd Medieval hammered silver short cross penny - needs fixing to ID 1603 James 1st hammered silver sixpence
British 15thC gold noble coin weight - ship with 2 Lion type

Post medieval cast copper alloy rectangular two piece buckle

C1650-1725

This is a very early piece of gold jewelry as what looked initially gold plated is actually solid gold and the black crust matches the growth recently found on low grade Celtic gold coins.

I exposed small parts of the black to reveal the gold but cannot clean it up any further as treasure has to sent to the museum in as dug condition.

Putting it under a scope you can clearly see where a central intaglio or similar was probably fitted.

One for the museum experts but what a great find - At a guess I would vote Roman and possibly an ear ring.

1.28g, 20.69mm L

1377-1399 Richard II hammered silver half penny

Obv + RICARD x REX : ANGL

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

0.37g, 12.93mm

1399 1413 Henry IV hammered silver half penny - light coinage - Type 1

Obv + hENRIC x REXx ANGL'

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

14.40mm,0.48g

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin type

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

19mm,1.35g

1625 Charles 1st hammered silver half groat
1578-9 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat - Greek cross mint mark

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross farthing

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev /NDE/ - London mint

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin type

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

 

Edward Ist to 3rd hammered silver penny

Obv ***ANGL

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Obv HENRICVS REX

Moneyer Nicole of Londion mint

Continental hammered silver farthing

1422-27 Henry VI hammered silver penny - Annulet issue

Annulets by neck, annulets in opposing quadrants in reverse cross

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev VIL/LA/CAL/ISIE - Calais mint

15thC Angel figure qtr gold noble coin weight 2.02g

Obv RVE

Medieval baldric buckle

Early-Medieval (Anglo-Saxon) single looped buckle frame (c. 450-600).

1648 English Civil War 3/4lb cannon ball - 1.5 inch dia

The shot was probably used in a small calibre gun such as a robinet or a falconet

The siege of Colchester occurred in the summer of 1648 when the English Civil War reignited in several areas of Britain. Colchester found itself in the thick of the unrest when a Royalist army on its way through East Anglia to raise support for the King, was attacked by Lord-General Thomas Fairfax at the head of a Parliamentary force. The initial Parliamentary attack forced the Royalist army to retreat behind the town's walls but was unable to bring about victory, so settled down to a siege.

 
1826 Trade weight - City of London mark 'Guildhall'   1554 Mary hammered silver groat
1214-49 Scottish Alexander II hammered silver half penny Roman bronze mount
 
17thc crotal bell   Medieval purse bar arm with knopped end
1840 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin issue

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1625 Charles 1st hammered silver penny 1583 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver six pence

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin issue

Obv EDWR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1351 - 3 Edward III hammered silver half groat - Pre Treaty series C

Closed C & E, 9 arches to tressure - no trefoils over crown

Obv EDWARDVS REX ANGLI Z FRANCI

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1589 Hans Krauwinckel German Jetton

Obv Europa riding bull on right, across waters of river Ravi

Rev Venus , accompanied by her attribute, a small cupid with his bow, standing naked between Pallas and Juno

PALLAS LVNO VENVS

Ref Mitchiner 1611

Unknown type with *I* I on Obv instead of pellets

1321 Edward II English jetton - Bust type Class XI

Obv Edward bust with succession of * and I

Rev Three armed cross, in each angle a 'facing bare human head ' border,, succession of letters B and S

Similar Ref Mitchiner 131 but with different legend

Medieval red and yellow enamelled belt slide decoration

10 to 40 AD Celtic bronze unit - Cunobelinus Pegasus Victory left ABC 2921 - sent to CCI for recording

ABC 2921 type as CCI 13.0095

13thC medieval seal matrix - letter W indicates traders initial

10-40 AD Cunobelius bronze coin - sent to CCI for recording

Jupiter Lion type VA 2107

1.07g, 12.56mm

ABC 2984 as CCI 13.0096

 

 

Fascinating large medieval lead brooch or mount - pin fixing on back like a brooch

Not seen one before

19thc hunting button 16thC Tudor button

2ndC Roman silver sent for ID

the broken silver piece will need more study - Sorry to say, this does not "jump off the page" for me.  I don't recognize the portrait or even the fragment of legend at first glance.  It does seem to be either Roman or Roman-inspired at very least, however - which makes it all the more puzzling for me since I am pretty familiar with the entire field.
We at least have the benefit of on obviously clean-shaven portrait which significantly narrows-down the field of potential identities.

Mark

 

Stunning decorated circa 8thC Saxon strap end

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

21.29mm ,3.85g

This is pretty unusual given the sort of material you generally seem to find since it's a good bit later - it appears from the legend to be Gratian - 367-383 and the reverse type is definitely REPARATIO REIPVB with Gratian standing left raising a kneeling female figure - an allegorical representation of  "The Republic" - pure propaganda, the Empire was in pretty dire straits at that time and having its lunch-money stolen in the schoolyard daily by every bully on the borders.
I can't quite make out the mint mark, but the type dates to 378-383.

Mark

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

17.36mm, 1.16g

This is a follis of someone from the 2nd tetrarchy - the reverse type is GENIO ... (could be EXERCITVS,  IMPERITORI, CAESARIS, AVGVSTI, POPVLI ROMANI or POP ROM )
Working from the letters in the field: "T - F", under GENIO POPVLI ROMANI there is a single type of Constantine I as Caesar from Lyons.  Under GENIO POP ROM there is a large selection of 2nd Tetrarchy folks from Western European mints.  I can't be certain the exergual mint mark looks like it could be PLN - in that case, it would be from the mint of London, and selecting for only mint of London GENIO POP ROM's, I find it could be only Maximinus II as Augustus, Constantine I as Augustus or Licinius I.  The fragment of legend on the obverse from 11:00 to 1:00 looks like it could be [...LIC] INIVS [PF AVG]
The other possible mintmarks for T - F fieldmarks in this type would be, basically, PTR or PLG for Trier or Lyon respectively - the same 3 Augusti are the possible issuers for these folles from those mints as well.
This is a Licinius I from Trier, but with those same field letters, from my collection - I think it's a pretty good match

This issue dates to 310-313 - I think we can say it's Licinius without too much uncertainty, and the only thing which remains uncertain is the exact mint from which it was issued - could be London, Trier or Lyon (but I lean towards London, although the center letter could be a T, in which case it's Trier)

Stunning zoomorphic decorated circa 8thC Saxon strap end
2ndC Roman fibular brooch Great shape 1754 George II milled copper farthing

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

The "British Copy" was a pretty good guess on your part - this does seem to be a generic contemporary copy of a Tetricus I PAX AVG type antoninianus

Mark

1351- 1361 Edward III hammered silver groat - Cross 1- Pre Treaty period

Obv EDWARD D G REX ANGL FRANC D HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

This is a "Quinarius" - or radiate half-antoninianus - of Allectus. He suceeded Carausius as emperor of the British Roman Empire, c. 293-296.  He suceeded chronologically, but as a ruler/conqueror, was not so much of a success.

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided half penny

Moneyer Walter of Canterbury mint

Clipped 4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

Your final 2 pieces I won't bother to try to illustrate - you can tell they're in pretty bad shape.  Those would be chipped rather than clipped, BTW.  No one ever bothered to clip or shave the edges of bronze coins - that was really only done with silver or gold - and even then it was not very productive since any questionable-looking coin would be likely to be weighed when changing hands.  The vast majority of clipped pieces (aside from the cut or broken halves and quarters made in the name of small change) were officially clipped earlier types which were made smaller to circulate beside later, smaller types.  Roman siliquae were officially clipped wholesale to comply with the weight standard of the Saxon sceattas, for example.

It appears to be one of the ubiquitous FEL TEMP REPARATIO reduced majorinae of Constantius II, c. 355-360, with the soldier spearing the unfortunate fallen horseman on the reverse - or it could be a contemporary copy of the same.  A large proportion of the surviving FEL TEMP's were actually local products, particularly in Britain and Gaul.

Mark

Clipped 4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

Your final 2 pieces I won't bother to try to illustrate - you can tell they're in pretty bad shape.  Those would be chipped rather than clipped, BTW.  No one ever bothered to clip or shave the edges of bronze coins - that was really only done with silver or gold - and even then it was not very productive since any questionable-looking coin would be likely to be weighed when changing hands.  The vast majority of clipped pieces (aside from the cut or broken halves and quarters made in the name of small change) were officially clipped earlier types which were made smaller to circulate beside later, smaller types.  Roman siliquae were officially clipped wholesale to comply with the weight standard of the Saxon sceattas, for example.

You can tell from the "mullet" hairdo is either Magnentius or Decentius, short-lived sucessors of Constans in the West, c. 350-353.  You had a "hoard" find of similar broken and chipped Magnentius and Decentius AE's in the last couple of years.

Mark

2ndC Roman fibular brooch 1247 Henry III hammered silver voided half penny
1842 Victoria milled silver shilling

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided half penny

Rev /NDL/IDE - London mint

1279 Edward 1st hammered silver penny - Florin issue - Cross 3

Obv EDWR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev VILL/A ***/ LLIE - Bristol mint

1839 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1208/9 John hammered silver short cross penny Class 6b1

Obv HENRICVS REX

Rev BANDVLF ON LVND - Moneyer Randvlf of London mint

1356-61 Edward III hammered silver penny - annulet in qtr on obv - Pre Treaty Durham ?

Obv EDWARD **

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON - London mint

1586 Hans Krauwincel II Rose orb Jetton

HANNS KRAVWINCKEL IN NVRENB

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin issue - Cross 3

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1361-9 Edward III hammered silver farthing - Type 17

Obv EDWARDVS **

London mint

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin issue - Cross 3

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1501-1521).
Venetian Soldino hammered silver coin 0.26g,12.08mm

Rev: LAVS TIBI SOLI (Thee Alone be Praised). Haloed figure of Christ holding a cross.

Obv: LE LAV DVX S M V (Leonardo Lauredan, Doge. St Mark of Venice.) Doge kneeling before Saint Mark.

1/4 full medieval hammered silver groat

1909 Edward VII milled gold half sovereign

Victorian childs 9 carat gold ring with glass stones 14.18mm,0.45g

Partial internal inscription legible - SHEER **

1842 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1stC Roman fibular brooch

'The Langton Down style was developed in Gaul in the late 1st C BC but saw use in Britain from the time of the Claudian invasion until about 75 AD. The spring on these brooches is enclosed within a distinctive tubing of fairly thin construction.The bow is flat and very thin decorated with grooves and ribs (reeding)'

 

2ndC Roman fibular brooch

Late 1st to 2nd century cast copper alloy headstud brooch

1274 Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Obv EDW ***** HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

1500-1700 mount 1500-1700 mount Medieval mount

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

This one is one of the very last of the Constantinian-era Centenionales - with this 2 Victories holding wreaths reverse - VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN - and a similarly sized Vota - VOT / X / MVLT / XX - reverse for both Constantius II and Constans in 347-348 (this piece is for Constans) all exactly exactly the same except for the name on the obverse.  I can't read the exergual mint mark on this one, but there is some very nice detail otherwise.

Mark

2ndC Roman bronze sent for ID

This is actually a Dupondius rather than a Sestertius.  Dupondii (2 Asses or 1/2 Sestertius) were struck in the same brass alloy as Sestertii but are a little smaller and portray the emperor wearing a radiate crown to distinguish bertween the Dupondius and the As with laureate busts on them.  This is a posthumous commemorative for Marcus Aurelius - died in 180 - and although the reverse is fragmentary you can make out a little of the CONSECRATIO S - C legend and see the feathers of the eagle on the reverse.
It would look a lot like this Sestertius:

Obv: DIVVS ANTONINVS PIVS - confusing, but it was Aurelius' official name as the adopted son of the emperor Antoninus Pius

Mark

17thC Thomas Reynolds bay maker of Colchester hammered copper trade farthing
Medieval long cross hammered silver penny - illegible

Medieval long cross hammered silver penny - illegible

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

Medieval buckle plate
Roman bronze weaving shuttle

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

This is one of the city commemoratives of the period 330-340 - they were contemporary with the GLORIA EXERCITVS soldiers and standard(s) types.  This one is the VRBS ROMA type in honor of Rome at the time of the adoption of Constantinople as Constantine's new capital.  The anepigraphic reverse - which in your photo needs to be rotated about 45º clockwise - is the mythic shewolf suckling the twins Romulus & Remus, founders of Rome.

Mark

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

Clearly a reduced-module Majorina of Constantius II with the FEL TEMP REPARATIO reverse - soldier spearing fallen horseman - c. 350-360.

Mark

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

I'm afraid I can't make any sense out of the reverse on the 1st piece in this email.  The obverse obviously shows a somewhat "sharp-faced" male head to right - it's not possible to tell if there was a radiate crown intended or actually on the portrait at one time.  The most important feature is that the portrait is bearded.  Beards went out of style around the time Constantine became sole ruler of the Roman world, and with the exception of only a few folks - Julian II being the most commonly-seen of them - including Johannes and Eugenius (both very rare) - you virtually don't see beards on Imperial portraits again.

This portrait looks nothing at all like Julian, so I'm pretty sure it's not him, or any of Illyrian Emperors from Aurelian through Diocletian - the face is simply the wrong shape.  I suspect it's either Claudius Gothicus (268-270) or one of the Gallic emperors - or a contemporary copy of one or the other.  The only thing I can even guess the reverse might be is a very minimalist attempt to depict the standing eagle on a Gothicus "CONSECRATIO" posthumous antoninianus - a very commonly copied type.

There is also a possibility it might be Gothicus' brother Quintillus who succeeded him for a very brief period - 2 or 3 months in 270 - records from the time are spotty and undependable, some say his reign was as short as 17 days, but the relative commonness of his coins tends to make that short of a reign pretty questionable.  If it is Quintillus, I have no idea what the reverse is supposed to be

So those are my best guesses - not, ultimately, satisfactory - but I'll keep thinking about it and perhaps it will become clearer what that reverse is supposed to be.

Mark

1327-77 Edward III hammered silver farthing - Star marked coinage, star after DON

Obv + EDWARDVS REX AN

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON* - London mint

Medieval hammered silver penny - illegible Roman lead medallion

1762 George III 1/4 gold guinea - 15.63mm,2.08g

Love token

 

Stunning large gilded silver medieval decorated silver finger ring - reported as treasure to museum

7.26g, 23.59mm

1504- 7 Henry VII hammered silver half groat - Two arches unjewelled - Crosslet im

Obv HENRICUS DEI GRA REX ANGLIE

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1307 Edward II hammered silver penny - Class 15b

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev VILL/SCIE/DMV/NDIBury St Edmunds mint

1327 Edward III hammered silver penny

Obv EDWR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1344 Edward III hammered silver Florin penny - Cross 3

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/CAN/TOR - Canterbury mint

1344 Edward III hammered silver Florin penny - Cross 3

Obv EDWAR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

Medieval enamelled harness pendant - blue and red enamel remains
Victorian copper ring 19thC livery button Medieval copper bale seal
 
1500-1700 mount   1696 William III milled silver shilling - Coventry mint

1413 -1422 Henry V hammered silver half penny - broken annulet by crown - im pierced

Std G type

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

1697 William III milled silver sixpence - Norwich mint

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross penny - Class 3b

Ov HENRICVS REX III

Rev TOM/ASO/ONN/ORb - Moneyer Tomas of Northampton mint

Georgian shoe bucckle

Very crisp 4thC Roman silver sent for ID

Wow, very nice.  This is, of course, a Siliqua of Valentinian, I 364-375.  From the mint at Arles, it dates to the earlier part of his reign, 364-7.  The reverse type is RESTITVTOR REIP - (Restorer of the Republic - pure propaganda) and shows the emperor standing facing, head right, holding a labarum with Chi-Rho symbol and Victory on globe. The OF - II in the field indicates the 2nd offiicina or workshop of the mint, the star above the II is a sequence mark.
The exergual mint mark reads CONST - this mint mark is one that confuses many beginners.  Although it appears to name the mint at Constantinople, Arles was renamed Constantina in honor of Constantine II beginning in 328. The name reverted to Arles in 340 upon the death of Constantine II, then was restored to Constantina when the city was re-captured (from Magnentius) by Constantius II in 353, and retained that name until the mint ceased producing bronze coinage in the mid-5th century.
The main references to cite for this piece are RSC 18 and RIC IX 6a7.

 

Mark

17thC decorated copper ring
1590-2 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny 1844 Victoria milled silver sixpence

1247 Henry III hammered silver voided long cross half penny

Moneyer Nicole

1327 Edward III hammered silver penny

Obv EDW** ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

C8thC Saxon mount with circle design

1353-1355 Edward III hammered silver half groat - Cross 3, 9 arches to treasure, Trefoils on cusps unbarred N's - Series 3

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

1351 Edward III hammered silver half groat - Pre treaty series B - 9 arches to treasure, Trefoils on cusps - open E & C's

Obv EDWARDVS REX ANGLI Z FRAN

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

1634 Charles 1st hammered copper rose farthing

1586 Hans Krauwincel II Rose orb Jeton

HANNS KRAVWINCKEL IN NVRENB

Medieval mount
Medieval buckle 4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

Either Valentinian I or Valens, the GLORIA ROMANORVM reverse with the emperor walking to the right, dragging a captive and carrying a labarum

Mark

Medieval hooked fastener

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

I can't be really specific, but it is one of the Caesars during the time of Constantine - it might be (but is unlikely to be) Licinius II, or it could be any of the 4 sons of Constantine the Great - Crispus, Constantine Jr., Constans or Constantius II. This probably dates to the late 3-teens / early 320's.

This legend, wreath and Vota combination reverse type was struck for all 5 of the Caesars (as well as 2 similar types for the Augusti) at various times.  The legend on the obverse ends "...CAES" so we know it's one of the Caesars, but I don't think we'll ever be able to tell which one. We also know it's not either of the "Augustus" legend, wreath & Vota reverse types (one honors Constantine, one honors Licinius).  For a Caesar, the circumferential legend on the reverse is CAESARVM NOSTRORVM ( [to] Our Caesars) - the Vota within the wreath is VOT / X - in other words, it's someone's 1st decennalia - the ceremonial observation of the completion of vows made to do certain things and make certain sacrifices for the 1st 10 years of rule, in order to assure the success of the next 10 (or 5) years.  I can't say whose it is - it would take more than just a complete obverse legend identifying the person on the obverse to be certain whose decenallia is being cited.  The decennalia named is not necessarily for the person on the obverse of the coin which complicates the matter just a little so it would probably take a complete mint mark (and any symbols associated with the mint mark) to be sure of the date and threfore whose decenallia is being honored. 

Oh, right, one other thing - the photo you sent of the reverse is 180º upside-down. 

Mark

1553 Mary hammered silver groat - Pomegranate mint mark

1504- 7 Henry VII hammered silver groat - two arches unjewelled to crown, Crosslet im

Obv hENRIC DI GRA REX ANGLIE Z FR

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

18thC Georgian silver hanger - Lion mark, maker TL

Thomas Liddiard of London

1778..1787
(registered Mar 1770)

17thC button Medieval D buckle General Post Office badge
16thC Tudor button Georgian silver thimble Posat medieval lead trade weight

Crispy Roman silver is start to 'cook' up after being in the cooker since March 2012

Cooked Roman silver sent for ID

This one came out quite clear.  It's Antoninus Pius (138-161) and the reverse type is FORTVNA AVG - which would be easy to tell even if the legend did not have the few clear letters with telltale wide spacing like this one displays.  The rudder and cornucopiae attributes are almost exclusively the adjuncts of Fortuna.  This coin was meant to be dated by the obverse legend, but the portion stating the Tribunician year is mostly off flan making it illegible.  However, this type was issued only in his 23rd & 324th Tribunician year, so we can date it to near the end of his reign 159-161.

Mark

Best condition William and Mary copper I have ever seen dug

1694 William and Mary milled copper half penny

1327 Edward III hammered silver penny - Cross 1

Obv EDW** ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

1574 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny
1817 George III milled silver sixpence 18thC Royal Navy button
Medieval hammered silver penny - quatrefoil to centre of reverse cross- York mint

1150 Stephen hammered silver penny - this appears to be a mule from North 879 and 878

Obv + STIEFNE

Rev Cross fleurty with a pile surrounded by a trefoil of annulets in each angle

Possible Bury St Edmunds mint - GILBERT

Ref North 879

18.58mm, 1.38g

Sent for recording and confirmed ID

1280 - 1286 Scottish Alexander III hammered silver half penny - 2nd coinage

Obv + ALEXANDER DEI GRA

Rev REX SCOTORUM

Long cross, a star in two quarters, each star has 6 points - type SA3HD -010

14.05mm0.58g

Medieval Henry hammered silver groat

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

1351 Edward III hammered silver penny - Pre Treaty Durham

Obv annulets to both side of neck

Rev annulet in one quadrants

Georgian gilded ring with stone
1500-1700 hinge plate 2ndC Roman plate brooch - white central enamelled section remains

1356 - 61 Edward III hammered silver penny - Pre Treaty series G - (a) annulet stops

Quadrefoil and pellet in centre of reverse cross - Archiepiscopal issue

Obv EDWARDVS REX ANGLI

Rev CIVI/TAS/EBO/RACI - York mint

 

Georgian double sided seal matrix
Roman pottery
16thC stone cannon ball George V Royal Engineers button

3rd Dragoons Guards one piece button- unlisted type

 
Medieval beehive thimble  

4thC Roman bronze sent for ID

This type is one which belongs to a smallish group of reverse devices which elicit "Ya know, that looks like..." comments on a regular basis.  Quite often these are Victory reverses since the pagan deity Victory formed the visual template for the Western visual concept of an "Angel". The Victory figures so common in Roman decorative arts simply morphed directly into Christian angels as the Empire shifted from a pagan to a Christian orientation.  This particular coin has also elicited a few other comments - with certain exergual mintmarks which can look somewhat like "wheels" we have had students insist that they see "An angel on a skateboard...".
What this coin actually portrays is an allegorical representation of Constantine's new capital city of Constantinople on the obverse shown as an armored female holding a spear over her shoulder and facing left with the legend: CONSTANTINOPOLIS.  It is a so-called city commemorative and a similar type from the same issue shows Rome similarly represented with the classic wolf-and-twins theme on a similarly anepigraphic reverse.  The reverse of your coin portrays Victory standing in the prow of a galley, holding a spear and resting on a shield.  The galley imagery was particularly well-suited to a coin referring to Constantiople which literally commands the maritime passage between Asia and Europe.

BC Roman Republican silver coin - cooking to remove crust

1344-51 Edward III hammered silver half penny - Florin coinage - Type 7

Obv +EDWARDVS REX

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

15.17mm, 0.62g

1272 Edward Ist hammered silver penny - Type 9a - Star on breast - un barred N's - pellet eyes

Obv +EDWR ANGL DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LOND/DON - London mint

1935 George V milled silver half crown {30 pence)
1844 Victoria milled silver shilling {12 pence} 1913 George V milled silver sixpence

Size comparison from milled silver 3 pence, sixpence, shilling (12 pence) to half crown (30 pence)

1697 William III milled silver sixpence - Norwich mint 1868 Victoria milled silver 3 pence
Unknown early widget - looks like a fibular brooch but no signs of any fixings ?? One for the museum
1919 George V milled silver sixpence 1578 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat
Georgian watch winder Medieval buckle

1670 John Winnock of Colchester hammered copper trade half penny

Obv HIS HALF PENY

Rev IOHN WINNOCK

Fleur de Lis

1594-6 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver penny Medieval bronze pot foot
1836 William IV milled silver four pence 18thC Royal Navy initialled silver cuff links
6inch dia Roman pottery bowl bottom 13thC lead seal matrix 17thC copper thimble
17thC Thomas Reynolds bays maker of Colchester hammered copper farthing - undated type
1582-4 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half groat

Crown introduced in 1340 by Philip VI (1328-50)

Royal Crown with 3 rosettes across body of crown

Rev Triple banded straight cross fleuretty AV

 

 

17thC crotal bells
1816 George III milled silver sixpence Edwardian copper signet ring
138AD Hadrian Roman bronze coin

1590-2 Elizabeth 1st hammered silver half penny – hand mintmark

 

Late Early Medieval (Anglo-Scandinavian) cast copper alloy fragment of a cheek piece from a harness fitting.

Saxon gilded harness pendant - circle and star design

As dug and now 'cooking' to remove crust

Primary Saxon silver sceat 600- 700 AD - sent to Fitzwilliam museum for recording and ID

Left facing bust

1.23g, 11.41mm

This new find (EMC 2013.0069) might be Series R9, but enhanced images would certainly be appreciated.

Best wishes,

Martin

Thank you for these excellent images of your coin. I can now see that it is interesting late variant of the Series E Vernus type, group 3, and so a coin of the Primary phase. c.695-720, and probably from East Anglia.

I have attached a relevant extract from M. Metcalf and W. Op den Velde, 'The monetary economy of the Netherlands, c.690-c.760 and the trade with
England: a study of the 'Porcupine' sceattas of Series E' Jaarboek voor
Munt- en Penningkunde 96 (2009), p. 212.

Best wishes,

Martin Allen

 

1795 Washington Grate Halfpenny

Obverse: G. WASHINGTON. THE FIRM FRIEND TO PEACE & HUMANITY [cinquefoil]
Reverse: PAYABLE BY CLARK & HARRIS 13. WORMWOOD St. BISHOPSGATE . LONDON / 1795

1150 AD Stephen hammered silver farthing


This is of Stephen type 1 (Cross Moline or Watford). Cut quarters of this period are very common, but they do not get recorded as often as they ought.

Best wishes
Martin

Huge medieval purse bar with W inscription - this would have been 7 inches long when complete ?

Towards the end of the 1400s it became fashionable for rich men to wear large purses hanging from their belts. They were made of velvet or other expensive fabric fitted to fancy metal frames. They were generally sewn below the bar.

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin issue Cross 3

Obv EDWAR ANGLE DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON

1639-40 Charles 1st hammered silver half groat - Triangle mint mark
I just cleaned up this crusty widget and it is decorated and gilded and reminds me of the bottom part cheek piece off a helmet - going to let the museum have a look

Medieval silver continental Sterling of Edward silver penny - Gaucher of Chatillon, count of Porcien, at Yves mint 1313-22.

Obv +GALCh’SCOMESPORC

Rev MON/ETN/OVA/y’VE

 
1761 George III & Charlotte coronation medallion  

George III - Jubilee of his reign (Crown, sword & sceptre) - 1809

 

Side 1: COMMEMOR GEORGE III ACCESSION on the ribbon. Below, 50 and K & S

Side 2: GRAND NATIONAL / JUBILEE . / CELEBRATED OCT . 25 . / 1809 . THE KING / HAVING ENTERED / THE 50. YEAR / OF HIS REIGN.


 

 

Whitworth Cavalry & Infantry ?

No regiment or militia listed ?

East Surrey Regiment

The East Surrey Regiment was a regiment in the British Army formed in 1881 from the amalgamation of the 31st (Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot and the 70th (Surrey) Regiment of Foot. In 1959, it was amalgamated with the Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey) to form the Queen's Royal Surrey Regiment.

19thC The Royal Regiment of Scotland button  

1344 Edward III hammered silver penny - Florin issue Cross 3

Obv EDWAR ANGLE DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/LON/DON

British Military belt buckle

DIEU . ET. LIO

Georgian domino
15th/16thC British Gold Nobel coin weight - Ship type with lis and Lion - Fleur de Lis on the stern

1641-3 Charles 1st hammered silver penny - mintmark 2 dots

Irish 1478 - 1483 Edward IV hammered silver penny - Seventh (Sun & Roses) Coinage

Rose each side of neck - Long cross with rose at centre, a rose and two suns or a sun and two roses alternating in the angles

Obv EDWARD REX ANGL Z FRANC

Rev CIVI/TAS/DUB/LIM - Dublin mint

Fixed hammered gold

1351-1361 Edward III gold half noble - Closed E at centre of cross - satire stops - Pre Treaty Period

The obverse shows a forward facing king in ship with sword in right hand and quartered shield of England and France in left.

Obv EDWAR DEI REX ANGL Z FRA D

4.12g, 25.12mm

Fixed hammered gold

1361 Edward III hammered gold 1/4 noble

Obv + EDWR + R ++ ANGLIE DVNS HY

Edward III (1361), Quarter-Noble, Transitional Treaty Period, quartered shield of arms, two pellets in upper left quarter, within beaded and linear tressures of eight arcs, pellets on cusps, fleur trefoils in spandrels, all within beaded circle, comma and saltire stops in legend, +edwr;r; anglie: dnvs; hv rev ornamental cross potent with annulets in angles and at centre, lis terminals, lions in angles, lis above lion in fourth quarter, within beaded and linear tressures of eight arcs, trefoils in spandrels, beaded circle surrounding, saltire stops in legend, +exaltabitvr: in: gloria

18.99mm, 1.93g

Size comprison between half and qtr gold Noble

1250 - 1400 Medieval buckle 16thC Tudor seal spoon handle

1272 Edward 1st hammered silver penny

Obv EDWR ANGLE DNS HYB

Rev CIVI/TAS/DVR/ENE - Durham mint

Late Saxon c10thC stirrup strap mount Class A Type 11a

late Early Medieval (Anglo-Saxon) cast copper alloy stirrup strap mount of Williams class A type 11.

The main body of the mount is triangular, with the two side edges being slightly convex. There is a trefoil terminal at the apex of the mount containing a rivet hole; the hole is slightly off centre, probably due to wear on the right hand side of the terminal. The main body of the mount has a cast design of a left facing lion (sometimes interpreted as a wolf), looking upwards with one front paw raised and a tail curled over its back. Below this design is an undecorated area containing a further two circular rivet holes, one of which is filled with corrosion products. There is a short flange projecting at a right angle from the lower edge of the mount, running between the positions of the lower rivet holes.The reverse of the mount is plain and undecorated.

 

Class: Strap Mount
Sub class: Williams Class A type 11

Chronology

Broad period: EARLY MEDIEVAL
Period from: EARLY MEDIEVAL
Period to: MEDIEVAL
Date from: Circa AD 1000
Date to: Circa AD 1100

Dimensions and weight

Length: 47.56 mm
Weight: 26.54 g
Quantity: 1

 

Possible gilded Iron Age bracelet
17thC thimble with name inscription C 10thC Saxon lead gaming piece

Roman fixed buckle for suspension Roman barrel pad lock lock arm

Interesting large carved stone - one for the museum to look at

63.26mm W x 63.93mm H

1751 Joan Theodor of Bavaria (1744-1763) 2 liard  Cu Obv EP ET PR LEO DUX B M F Ñ L H 1751
I THEOD CAR D G BAV D

2ndC Roman silver coin - cooking it to remove crust
2ndC Roman fibular brooch Medieval lead Knights Templer badge
16th C Elizabeth 1st prohibited lead tavern pieces - bottle flowing into glass 13thC non heraldic lead seal matrix
1250- 1400 buckle

1180-1189 Henry 1st hammered silver short cross farthing – Class -  Obv RE(I

Medieval lead token 17th (Leicestershire) Regiment of Foot button
2ndC Roman fibular brooch

1623-4 James 1st hammered silver half groat – Lis mint mark

 
1605-6 James 1st hammered silver shilling (12 pence) - Rose mint mark  
Anglo Saxon harness cheek piece

(1501-1521).
Venetian Soldino hammered silver coin

Rev: LAVS TIBI SOLI (Thee Alone be Praised). Haloed figure of Christ holding a cross.

Obv: LE LAV DVX S M V (Leonardo Lauredan, Doge. St Mark of Venice.) Doge kneeling before Saint Mark.

1350-64 Field of France Jetton

Obv Field bearing 9 lis arranged 1-2-3-2-1 with some tracery:

+ LED CONTE rosette TROVVERES

 

As dug and now 'cooking' to remove crust

Primary Saxon silver sceat 600- 700 AD - sent to Fitzwilliam museum for recording and ID

Left facing bust

1.23g, 11.41mm

This new find (EMC 2013.0069) might be Series R9, but enhanced images would certainly be appreciated.

Best wishes,

Martin

Saxon silver sceat - Series E Vernus type, group 3, and so a coin of the Primary phase. c.695-720 EMC 2013.0069

As dug and now 'cooking' to remove crust

Primary Saxon silver sceat 600- 700 AD - sent to Fitzwilliam museum for recording and ID

Left facing bust

1.23g, 11.41mm

Many thanks. This is EMC 2013.0066.

Series D (Type 2c).

Best wishes,

Martin

   
   
   
   

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