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Celtic gold coins found here by tribe

 

 

 

 

 

Celtic coins were produced in two ways, conventionally described as struck and cast. Both methods required a considerable degree of technical knowledge to ensure successful results.

The process of striking a coin began with the production of a blank. This was probably formed in a clay mould, but it is still uncertain how the metal alloy was placed in the mould. It probably wasn't poured in, which would make precise weight control difficult, but perhaps put into the mould in powder or nugget form, or possibly as sections from carefully measured ingots.

Celtic dies were made of iron and/or bronze. They are extremely rare, since they were clearly carefully looked after while they were in use, and thus very rarely lost, and they were often used to destruction.. The quality of engraving on many dies is superb, and it is difficult to imagine how some tiny details were engraved on dies just a few millimetres in diameter.

The engraving ability of the moneyers was matched by their control of the weight and alloy of the coinage. They were capable of producing thousands of coins deviating just a few milligrams each side of the intended weight, and they could make subtle alterations to the quality of the alloy, masking a decrease in the precious metal content.

Most gold and silver Celtic coins also occur as plated forgeries. They were produced by coating a base metal core with gold or silver alloy before striking took place, either by dipping the core in molten alloy, or by hammering a thin layer of gold or silver around the core until it bonded with the base metal. Dies used for genuine coins were sometimes also used for plated examples; alternatively, dies could be faked by making a cast from a mould bearing the impression of a genuine coin, or by pressing a genuine coin into soft metal which was then hardened to form a die; sometimes the design of a coin was simply copied onto a new die, resulting in the reversal of the correct image.

The production of cast coins required very different techniques. The cast coins from south-east Britain were produced by pouring molten alloy into a set of moulds joined by runners, which were broken apart when the metal had cooled. The breaks were not always neat and often parts of the sprue - the joining portion between the coins - remain attached to the coin itself.

The earliest examples of these coins in Britain have relatively fine images, which were presumably made by pressing a coin into the mould. As this process was successively repeated, the quality of the image being reproduced became ever worse, eventually becoming a featureless blob

 

 

 

All coins on this page have been found by us and have been recorded by the Celtic Coin Index. They are available to view on the national Database

The index contains 37925 Iron Age coins of which 23623 are provenanced and they have 37751 examples with images attached

http://finds.org.uk/CCI/

Comments against our coins are from Dr Philip de Jersey and John Sills

Celtic coins starting coming into Britain around 150 B.C. and continued to be imported until after the Gallic War in 50 B.C. These imports were mainly gold staters and quarter staters minted Gallia Belgica (northern France) and copied from copies of gold staters of Philip II of Macedon. Some of the Gallo-Belgic coins came with immigrant settlers and others may have come with British mercenaries returning home after fighting the Romans in Gaul; but most of the imported coins were probably the result of cross-Channel trade, which included slave trading. The Greek geographer Strabo (ca. 60 BC to A.D. 20), whose name means “squint-eyed”, lists as the principal exports of Britain “grain, cattle, gold, silver and iron … also hides and slaves and dogs that are by nature suited to the purposes of the chase.”

 

 

The Trinovantes or Trinobantes were one of the Celtic tribes of pre-Roman Britain. Their territory was on the north side of the Thames estuary in current Essex and Suffolk, and included lands now located in Greater London. They were bordered to the north by the Iceni, and to the west by the Catuvellauni. Their name derives from the Celtic intensive prefix "tri-" and "novio" - new, so meaning "very new" in the sense of "newcomers", but possibly with an applied sense of vigorous or lively - so the name could mean "the very vigorous people". Their capital was Camulodunum (modern Colchester), one proposed site of the legendary Camelot.

Shortly before Julius Caesar's invasion of Britain in 55 and 54 BC, the Trinovantes were considered the most powerful tribe in Britain. At this time their capital was probably at Braughing (in modern-day Hertfordshire). In some manuscripts of Caesar's Gallic War their king is referred to as Imanuentius, although in other manuscripts no name is given. Some time before Caesar's second expedition this king was overthrown by Cassivellaunus, who is usually assumed to have belonged to the Catuvellauni. His son, Mandubracius, fled to the protection of Caesar in Gaul. During his second expedition Caesar defeated Cassivellaunus and restored Mandubracius to the kingship, and Cassivellaunus undertook not to molest him again. Tribute was also agreed.

The next identifiable king of the Trinovantes, known from numismatic evidence, was Addedomarus, who took power c. 20-15 BC, and moved the tribe's capital to Camulodunum. For a brief period c. 10 BC Tasciovanus of the Catuvellauni issued coins from Camulodunum, suggesting that he conquered the Trinovantes, but he was soon forced to withdraw, perhaps as a result of pressure from the Romans, as his later coins no longer bear the mark "Rex", and Addedomarus was restored. Addedomarus was briefly succeeded by his son Dubnovellaunus c. 10–5 BC, but a few years later the tribe was finally conquered by either Tasciovanus or his son Cunobelinus. Mandubracius, Addedomarus and Dubnovellaunus all appear in later, post-Roman and medieval British Celtic genealogies and legends as Manawydan, Aedd Mawr (Addedo the Great) and Dyfnwal Moelmut (Dubnovellaunus the Bald and Silent). The Welsh Triads recall Aedd Mawr as one of the founders of Britain.

The Trinovantes reappeared in history when they participated in Boudica's revolt against the Roman Empire in 60 AD. Their name was given to one of the civitates of Roman Britain, whose chief town was Caesaromagus (modern Chelmsford, Essex). The style of their rich burials (see facies of Aylesford) is of continental origin and evidence of their affiliation to the Belgic people. Their name was re-used as Trinovantum, the supposed original name of London, by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his fictitious Historia Regum Britanniae, in which he claimed the name derived from Troi-novantum or "New Troy", connecting this with the legend that Britain was founded by Brutus and other refugees from the Trojan War.

The oldest celtic gold coins found here - unknown continental tribe

175 BC Celtic gold qtr stater Thanks to John Sills at the CCI for the ID

12mm,1.96g

ABC 34 Defaced Die quarter with a left-facing obverse bust obscured by lines and a left-facing horse and rider on the reverse with triskeles below. This type was struck somewhere in the French/Belgian border region in the 2nd century BC by an unknown tribe and possibly dates to around 175 BC plus or minus a couple of decades either way. Used to be very rare, I listed 17 examples in my 2003 book but there are perhaps 30 or so known now

Hope this is of some use

All the best

John>>

Mid 2nd C BC

Gallo- Belgic A type

Very interesting, very thin (1mm) like a medieval hammered gold- Celtic gold qtr gold stater - sent to PAS ID and recording

1.75g, 15mm

Iron Age, mid-2nd century BC
Probably made in northern France or Belgium another one found at Fenny Stratford near Milton Keynes, England

One of the earliest coins in Britain

Iron Age, mid-2nd century BC
Probably made in northern France or Belgium; found at Fenny Stratford near Milton Keynes, England

One of the earliest coins in Britain

This is a superb example of the Iron Age die-engraver's art. It also represents what is thought to be the first type of coin ever to circulate in Britain. They were probably made on the Continent in northern France or Belgium. Gold coins like this crossed over the English Channel, perhaps in trade or as gifts between high-ranking individuals. Some of them were eventually buried in coin hoards and not recovered by their owners. The owner may have died, or simply forgotten where they had put them. Alternatively, the coins may have been intended as permanent, sacred offerings to the gods. They are mostly found today by metal-detectorists, in locations throughout south-east England. Another one was found at Fenny Stratford near Milton Keynes.

The design of the coin is, at several stages removed, descended from the Greek gold staters of King Philip II of Macedon (reigned 359-336 BC). The hair on the left-facing head has grown considerably, while the original two-horsed chariot on the reverse of the coin has been transformed here into a lively, abstract depiction of a horse surrounded by a large array of symbols.

I.M. Stead and S. Youngs, Celts, British Museum Pocket Treasury (London, The British Museum Press, 1996)

D. Nash, Coinage in the Celtic world (London, Seaby, 1987)

Mid 2nd C BC

Gallo- Belgic A type

 

1.75g,14.57mm - Reported as potential hoard to museum

Mid 2nd C BC

Gallo- Belgic A type

 

1.80g,14.30mm - Reported as potential hoard to museum

Mid 2nd C BC

1.74g,15mm

45 BC to 25BC2010Exportspics Addedomarus - Trinovantian tribe

Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) was a king of south-eastern Britain in the late 1st century BC. His name is known only from his inscribed coins, the distribution of which seem to indicate that he was the ruler of the Trinovantes.

He was the first king to produce inscribed coins north of the Thames, perhaps as early as 45 BC, although some estimates are as late as 15 BC. He seems to have moved the Trinovantian capital from Braughing in Hertfordshire to Camulodunum (Colchester, Essex). For a brief period (ca. 15-10 BC) he seems to have been supplanted by Tasciovanus of the Catuvellauni, who issued coins from Camulodunum at that time. Addedomarus then appears to have regained power and reigned until 10-5 BC, when he was succeeded by Dubnovellaunus.

17.54mm,5.50g

 

18.27mm, 5.47g

 

17.43mm,5.51g

 

Qtr stater 5.26g,18.65mm

 

5.54g,17.39mm

 

1.26g, 11.98mm

18.64mm, 5.61g

Very unusual die strike - gold appears to be in an almost non moldern state during the strike

Qtr stater 1.26g, 13.19mm

17.75mm, 5.64g CCI 06.0445

18.62 mm - 5.48 g

'that's a fine coin to start the season with! It'll be CCI 06.0412.'

5.58g, 15.72mm CCI 05.0752

 

5.45g, 18.78 mm

'thanks very much for these, nice to see another Addedomaros after a gap of a few weeks! This one will be CCI 05.0749. The obverse is good, looks like one of the earlier dies in the series with the pellets between the arms. It's interesting that this one is that much further from the bulk of the other coins; it still fascinates and puzzles me, trying to work out exactly what sort of site you've got there, or what the precise pattern is behind the deposition of the coins'.

5.50g, 16.35mm

CCI 05.0679

5.63g, 17.96mm

CCI 05.0678

5.55g, 16.02mm

5.51g - 19.05 m

This one will be CCI 05.0667.

As you say, a very well-used reverse die. I think I recognize the die - after looking at these quite intensively over the last year or two, the individual dies start to become recognizable. The obverse is on the other hand pretty sharp, and must have been struck from a fairly fresh die.

'this one's a real cracker!

Certainly one of the best I've recorded in recent years, with just a little wear, as you say. The quality of the engraving is also extremely high - I'm sure these must have been among the first dies engraved for this type. The horse's muzzles which I mentioned last time are particularly neat here, it's really unusual to see them quite so clearly. I also suspect, though I haven't worked out how to prove it yet, that the coins with the pellets between the spiral arms are the earlier examples of this type.

I'll record this one as CCI 05.0655'

 

'Well, this is a nice one, and as you say with those intriguing symbols above the horse visible. What they seem to be is three horse's muzzles - on some dies they are virtually identical to the muzzle actually on the horse. Curiously, at roughly the same time that Addedomaros was using this motif on his staters, so was Commios, down in Hampshire. In fact since Commios is generally dated a little earlier than Addedomaros, it's not impossible that the latter encountered one of Commios's staters and decided to copy this feature. It quite often appears blundered, which suggests that the die engravers didn't always know what they were looking at. I'll record this one as CCI 05.0603, and I look forward to more!

5.53g 18mm

CCI 05.0290

5.62g 17mm

CCI 05.0291

5.63g,17mm

CCI 05.0293

5.57g 16mm

CCI 05.0292

19 mm, 5.45g CCI 05.0285 17mm 5.42g
45- 30 BC 18 mm 5.62 g CCI 05.0286

5.30g 16mm

CCI 05.0267

Left example 5.64g, 16mm CCI 05.0212
Right example 5.54g, 17mm CCI 05.0213

5.56g 17mm

CCI 05.0211

5.50g 17mm

Thanks to Philip at the CCI for this update 'a very nice example of the Addedomaros spiral stater, VA 1620. Lots of them about now (150 plus) but this is a very decent example - though as usual without a trace of the reverse inscription, all off the edge of the flan. VA's dating is a bit unrealistic, I would suggest anywhere between 45 and 30 BC, but certainly a little later than the Gallo-Belgic stater you recorded before. This one will be CCI 05.0196.

CCI No 04.0678

'this is a very good example, both sides nice and sharp. I'm doing some detailed work on the dies of this type at the moment, there are quite a lot - something like 25-30 obverse dies and maybe 50 for the reverse - so it must have been quite a sizeable coinage, probably produced over a number of years. Somewhere between about 45 - 25 BC is probably a reasonable guess'.

Addedomaros 45BC Celtic gold stater - sent to CCI for recording 18.32mm, 5.48g

The nice new Addedomaros is 13.0618, good to see a bit of the legend on the reverse.

All the best

John

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

13.22mm, 1.33g

It's always good to see another one of these, the obverses of this particular type of Addedo quarter are a nightmare to die link because they're so similar so the more examples there are the better; I've recorded it as 13.0558.

Best Wishes

John

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording

18.42mm, 5.53g

13.0533

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording

17.13mm, 5.54g

13.0532

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording

17.70mm, 5.56g

I've recorded the latest Addedo stater as 13.0498, another fine looking coin.  If it's OK with you I'll wait till later in the season to send information about the die links, as I mentioned the Index is in storage till mid October and it's almost as quick to die link several coins as it is to do one or two.

John

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording & reported as potential addition hoard to museum

18.68mm, 5.61g

13.0488

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording & reported as potential addition hoard to museum

17.98mm, 5.57g

13.0487

45 BC to 25BC Addedomarus - Trinovantian tribe Celtic gold stater - sent to PAS for recording

5.58g, 18mm

Stunning strike of 45 BC to 25BC Addedomarus - Trinovantian tribe Celtic gold qtr stater - flower type - sent to PAS for recording

VA1608 Very rare

13mm,1.36g

45 BC Addedomarus Celtic gold stater - reported to PAS for recording

16.5mm, 5.48g

45 BC Addedomarus Celtic gold qtr stater - reported to PAS for recording

13.1mm, 1.33g

Probably a 40 BC Southern style QC type or even a Regini - it is inbetween the two, classed as rare

Sent to PAS for recording

12.1mm,1.36g

45 BC Addedomarus Celtic gold stater - reported as hoard to museum

5.57g, 18.2mm

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold full stater fragement - sent to museum as hoard addendum

16.5mm,2.31g

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.30g,13.07mm

45 BC to 25BC Addedomarus - Trinovantian tribe Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.34g, 12.34mm

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

5.48g, 16.54mm

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

5.42g, 15.79mm

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

5.58g, 16.43mm

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

5.58g, 18.27mm

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

5.49g, 18.40mm

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

18.54mm,5.49g

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

17.35mm,5.49g

45 BC Addedomarus (sometimes written Aθθedomarus on coins) Celtic gold full stater

Reported as hoard to museum

5.54g,20.37mm

Addedomaros 45BC Celtic gold stater - reported to museum as hoard addendum

5.48g, 17.73mm

Addedomarus 45BC Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

13.35mm,1.29g

45 BC to 25BC Addedomarus - Trinovantian tribe Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.32g,13.23mm

Cantii.

The Cantiaci or Cantii were a Celtic people living in Britain before the Roman conquest, and gave their name to a civitas of Roman Britain. They lived in the area now called Kent, in south-eastern England. Their capital was Durovernum Cantiacorum, now Canterbury.

 

50 BC Uninscribed 'P' gold - 'Trophy' Type - 1/4 Celtic gold coin -1.33g, 10.43mm

Beaded trophy quater, ABC 2243, BMC 435, not in VA.  Extremely rare, 9 others known.  An interesting Essex type because of its Kentish associations (derived from the Kentish trophy issue but a separate type), it may have been struck by an otherwise unknown offshoot of the Cantii.

CCI 12.0370

This could be a 50BC Cantii Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording and confirmed ID

11.19mm, 1.40g

Just found Jim's Celtic in my new Chris Rudd book and it is classed as Extremely rare - only 6 to 15 exist


It is a Floret Trophy type VA 146,BMC 436 and as I ID'd correctly attributed to the Cantii tribe

50 BC Uninscribed 'P' gold - 'Trophy' Type - 1/4 Celtic gold coin - 1.38g, 11.99mm

Beaded trophy quater, ABC 2243, BMC 435, not in VA.  Extremely rare, 10 others known.  An interesting Essex type because of its Kentish associations (derived from the Kentish trophy issue but a separate type), it may have been struck by an otherwise unknown offshoot of the Cantii.

50BC Cantii Celtic gold qtr stater

It is a Floret Trophy type VA 146,BMC 436 attributed to the Cantii tribe - sent to PAS for recording

1.28g, 12.08mm

 

 

 

50 BC Clacton type Celtic gold - Trinovantian tribe

Qtr stater

This example clearly shows the gold, copper, silver mix of these coins

13.62,1.33g

I've recorded the latest Clacton quarter (1.33g) as 13.0083

John

Trinovantes British G “Clacton” quarter, Hobbs 192 Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC

Chris Rudd 23.41 Clacton de Jersey - Classed as scarce

1.28g,14.25mm

Trinovantes British G “Clacton” quarter, Hobbs 192 Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC

Chris Rudd 23.41 Clacton de Jersey - Classed as scarce

1.41g, 11.93mm

Late British G 'Early Clacton'

CCI 12.0840

British G 'Early Clacton' gold stater

5.25g, 19.54mm

CCI 12.0853

50 BC late British G 'Early Clacton'

CCI 12.0843

5.07g, 19.7mm

Celtic gold qtr stater - first off this type I have seen

12.0751) is a Clacton Cross type, ABC 2356, the companion quarter to British F, the Late Clacton stater, ABC 2332.  In ABC it's illustrated as a 'three men in a boat' design but the obverse is probably a degraded boar and it should be the other way up; at the moment there are around 30 known, mostly from Essex and Suffolk so it's a definite Trinovantian type.

John

1.42g, 13.55 mm

Celtic gold full stater - Clacton type

6.43g, 20.30mm Ref Hobbs 142

British A1 or E stater.  This coin is from the same obverse die that was later used to strike the Waldingfield type, VA 1462, ABC 2335.  It’s from an unrecorded reverse die with an uncertain symbol below the horse and is midway between the Westerham and Waldingfield types, if anything closer to the latter, which is extremely rare (not the Clacton type though this particular coin is very similar)

CCI 12.0367

Excellent heavy full stater

Disjointed horse, pellet below

19.76mm, 6.13g

Late Clacton stater, VA 1455, ABC 2329.  There are two main varieties of this type, one with a simple pellet below the horse and the other with a winged pellet or star; this is the latter type which is rarer than the simple pellet type, with only 10 others known.

CCI 12.0377

1stC BC Celtic gold 1/4 stater

Pictures as dug and after partial 'cooking'

14.46mm, 1.40g

This one has been allocated the CCI number 10.1044.

It is a British G “Clacton” quarter, Hobbs 192 (he mis-identified it as an H quarter for some reason). At least 44 known before this – from right across the area most people would label as territory of the Trinovantes...

Ian

Trinovantes Clacton type Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC 1.25g, 12.94mm - CCI 07.0124 Trinovantes Clacton type Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC 1.28g, 13.72mm CCI 06.0491

Trinovantes Clacton type Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC 1.26g, 14.04mm CCI 06.0492

'many thanks for these two Clacton 50BC quarters. The first one will be CCI 06.0491, the second one 06.0492. Not much I can say about these except that the second one is probably the later of the two, struck from a rather more stylized reverse die. But 'later' in this context might only be a matter of days or weeks, I don't think these coins were struck over a very long period'.

50BC Trinovantes Celtic gold (Clacton type)1/4 stater - 1.13g, 13.71g

CCI 06.0188

The Clacton quarter is one of those where the wear on the obverse makes it look as though there's a face - and perhaps the Celts who saw the coin thought that too, although it is based on the same boat that appears on the Gallo-Belgic coin. Again it's not particularly rare, at least not anymore - there are a good dozen or more from this obverse die, and probably this reverse too although it's difficult to be sure from this image'.

Trinovantes Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC- 1.29g 14mm

'yet another very interesting coin. This is a Clacton quarter stater, unlisted in Van Arsdell but in the British Museum catalogue (in the wrong place, with the Corieltauvi) as BMC 192, and in 'Coins of England' as no. 42. These coins were almost unknown in the late 1980s, but there are now about 60 of them recorded here, mostly from Essex and Suffolk. The reverse design is basically the same as the better-known Clacton stater (VA 1455), while the obverse has yet another interpretation of the three men in a boat design, here with two 'men', and sometimes looking like a human face. Unfortunately not readily visible on this one, though you should be able to pick out the outline of the boat.

Of those 60 or so examples, possibly as few as two are struck from the same reverse die as this coin, which has several large flaws and is probably from late in the series (as the use of a nearly plain obverse die also suggests). Both of the earlier two coins came from Suffolk, one from Ipswich and the other near Alderton. The type probably dates to c. 50 BC and was definitely a production of the Trinovantes.

CCI 05.296.

'This is an example of the Clacton 1/4 stater - it's not listed in VA, but there's one in the British Museum catalogue, at BMC 192 (where it's incorrectly attributed to the Corieltauvi). These coins were virtually unknown until the 1980s, but we now have records of more than 50 of them, predominantly from Essex, and it seems certain to be the quarter stater type associated with the full Clacton stater. There is strong Gallo-Belgic influence, as you mention - the obverse seems to be copied from the 'three men in a boat' design found on the imported Gallo-Belgic quarter staters, while the reverse is indeed nearly identical to the Clacton stater type. Its date is probably c. 50 BC.

This one will be in the Index as CCI 04.2136'.

'It's a very nice example of one of the rarer Clacton types - only just over 20 of the basic type (VA 1458) are recorded, and there are some variations within that group (mostly in minor elements of decoration, and in particular the form of the 'flower' beneath the horse)'. It will be CCI 04.0481. '70 BC

Trinovantes Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC - sent to CCI for recording - reported as potential hoard

0.70g, 13.65mm

13.0670 - Clacton quarter, ABC 2350, looks like a late example with many pellets above the horse.

50 BC Trinovantes British G “Clacton” Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording and reported as hoard to museum

1.29g,14.45mm

c 50 BC Celtic gold qtr stater - Similar to a Clacton Cross type but not a match in the Ref books, Hobbs and Rudd - sent to PAS for recording and ID

1.44g, 13.5mm

Van Arsdell VA 1460-1

http://www.celticcoins.ca/record.php?coin_id=010056

Trinovantes British G “Clacton” quarter, Hobbs 192 Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC - sent to PAS for recording

Chris Rudd 23.41 Clacton de Jersey - Classed as scarce

1.25g, 13.5mm

50BC Clacton type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

13.1mm, 1.43g

50 BC late British G 'Early Clacton' debased gold stater fragment - sent to PAS for recording

0.55g, 9.9mm

50 BC late British G 'Early Clacton' gold stater - sent to PAS for recording

20mm, 5.73g

Hard to imagine the skill required in those days to to put two thin gold sheets over a bronze inner. Contemporary forgery of 'Clacton' type gold stater circa 70 BC

Trinovantes British G “Clacton” quarter, Hobbs 192 Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC

Chris Rudd 23.41 Clacton de Jersey - Classed as scarce

1.47g,14.2mm

Reported as hoard addendum to museum

Trinovantes British G “Clacton” quarter, Hobbs 192 Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC - sent to PAS for recording

Chris Rudd 23.41 Clacton de Jersey - Classed as scarce

1.41g, 11.93mm

Trinovantes British G “Clacton” quarter, Hobbs 192 Celtic gold 1/4 stater 50BC

Chris Rudd 23.41 Clacton de Jersey - Classed as scarce

Reported to museum for recording

1.50g,13.39mm

50 BC Trinovantes British British G 'Early Clacton' gold stater

Debased gold

0.89g, 9.91mm

Sent to museum for recording and addendum to existing hoard

Corieltauvi - 1stC BC

The Corieltauvi (formerly thought to be called the Coritani, and sometimes referred to as the Corieltavi) were a tribe of people living in Britain prior to the Roman conquest, and thereafter a civitas of Roman Britain. Their territory was in what is now the English East Midlands, in the counties of Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Rutland and Northamptonshire. They were bordered by the Brigantes to the North, the Cornovii to the West, the Dobunni and Catuvellauni to the South, and the Iceni to the East. Their capital was called Ratae Corieltauvorum, known today as Leicester.

1stC BC Corieltauvi celtic stater CCI 07.0103

 

'many thanks for the images, this is very interesting. It's your first Corieltauvi - to be precise the kite stater, listed as VA 825, nos 3181-3184 in the BM catalogue and no. 392 in 'Coins of England'. The reverse needs to be rotated 180 degrees and you get the horse left, with the diamond-shaped kite above containing pellets; and faint remains of a wreath design on the obverse.

This type has become relatively common in the last few years because of some substantial hoard finds in East Yorkshire - something like 150 recorded now. It's fairly unusual to see one down in Essex, although there are a few Corieltauvian coins from the county. In terms of date it's probably very late first century BC; most of these coins are either in base gold or plated. All in all a very interesting addition to your finds. I'll record this as CCI 07.0103'. Dr Philip de Jersey

Uninscribed Corieltauvi North Eastern gold - 'Ferriby' type gold stater - Contemporary forgery

'excessively rare Celtic gold coin'

Ref Hobbs 3167

9AD to 40 AD Cunobelin - Catuvellauni

Cunobelinus appears to have taken power around 9 AD, minting coins from both Camulodunum (Colchester, capital of the Trinovantes) and Verlamion (later the Roman town of Verulamium, now modern St Albans), capital of the Catuvellauni. Some of the Verulamium coins name him as the son of Tasciovanus, a previous king of the Catuvellauni; unlike his father's, his coins name no co-rulers

Cunobeline (or Cunobelin, from Latin Cunobelinus, derived from Greek Kynobellinus, Κυνοβελλίνος) was a king in pre-Roman Britain from the late first century BC until the 40s AD. He is mentioned in passing by the classical historians Suetonius and Dio Cassius, and many coins bearing his inscription have been found.

1/4 stater of Cunobelin

Cunobelin wild type quarter,

CCI 12.0752

1.34g,10.8mm

1/4 stater of Cunobelin Inscribed CAM CV AGR Ref Hobbs 1854

12.3mm.1.26g

Cuno AGR quarter, BMC 1854, ABC 3002, not in VA.  Extremely rare, good to see the full AGR and the bottom of the flan on the reverse despite the chip.

CCI 12.0375

Celtic gold full stater - very rare bigga type

 

5.51g, 16.86

Cunobelin biga stater, VA 1910, BMC 1769-1771, ABC 2771.  Still very rare.

CCI 12.0372

Celtic gold qtr stater - 11.55mm, 1.33g

Cunobelin linear type quarter, VA 1927, ABC 2810

CCI 12.0373

Celtic gold qtr stater - 11.89mm,1.22g

Cunobelin wild type quarter, VA 1935, ABC 2813

CCI 12.0374

Celtic gold qtr stater biga type 10 to 40 AD

1.36g, 10.93mm

Cunobelin biga stater, VA 1910, BMC 1769-1771, ABC 2771.  Still very rare.

CCI 12.0372

Cunobelin Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

12.41mm, 1.26g

 
Thanks for the Cunobelin quarter from *****, CCI 09.3504.
 
It can be tricky to tell the various types apart because with some of them there's no clear dividing line and the Wild and Plastic types in particular are very similar, but this looks like the Plastic type, Van Arsdell 2015-1.
 
All the best
 
John
Very interesting die type of a 10 to 40 AD Cunobelin 1/4 gold stater - note the blocked horse. Sent to Celtic Coin index for recording and more information on type 0.83g, 11.84mm

Cunobelin Celtic gold stater 5.44g, 17.89mm - Northern Gold 'Linear type'

Obv corn ear,to 1 CA, to r.MV, below CA cross

Rev horse r ., pellet, leaf q & pellet, below CVN, pellet boarder va 1925 Ref Hobbs

'Thanks for this, a fine Cunobelin linear stater indeed. There are a few with the pellet over the M within the group listed as VA 1925.05 in the online CCI, at
http://www.finds.org.uk/CCI/images-lister.php?&VA_type=1925.05

Among these coins such as
http://www.finds.org.uk/CCI/details.php?coin_num=0.1532 appear to be from the same pair of dies as yours. I'll record it as CCI 08.9151.'

Celtic gold 1/4 stater (Biga type) head facing left

1.38g, 10.89 mm

 

'another cracking little coin. It is the biga type as you say, still quite rare: we have just over 20 of the quarter recorded. I had hoped to have a look at the dies in comparison to the rest of the coins in Oxford this morning, but ran out of time and I'm now back in Guernsey again. That'll have to wait a while, but in the meantime it looks as though it's one of the later strikings of this type, because of the simplified CAMVL inscription on the obverse. The earliest examples have each letter very clearly defined, but they soon merge into what looks almost like a zigzag on some coins.

Saying it's a 'late striking' is all relative of course: it's possible that the biga type was struck over a very short period, perhaps even just months and certainly unlikely to be more than say five years or so, sometime around 8 - 13 AD I would estimate. It'll be CCI 05.0688

1stC AD Cunobelin Celtic gold 1/4 stater 1.32g, 13.43mm - Cunobelin full Celtic Stater 5.38g, 19.24mm

CCI 07.0181, the 'A' quarter stater: 12 of these. This is one of the best for the reverse, it's unusual to get just about the whole 'A' visible.

 

CCI 07.0182, the wild stater (VA 1933): not so scarce, almost 90 recorded, but a fine coin nonetheless. Interestingly it's from the same pair of dies as one of your earlier Cuno staters, CCI 04.0679.

 

1/4 Gold stater

 

The Cunobelin quarter is rarer. It's actually the so-called 'plastic' type, VA 2017 (CCI 04.2296). The key to its identification is that it's the only Cunobelin type which has CAM CVN on the obverse, rather than the usual CAMV. We have records of just 17 other examples. There are also other, rarer subtypes, which have A or AGR on the reverse coupled with this obverse'.

Gold full stater 10 to 40 AD

Celtic coin Index as CCI 03.0811.

3 - 40AD Cunoblein staters found as a hoard

CCI 04.0477 'classic A' series, VA 2027-1. Generally believed to have been the last major series of his gold, so probably dating from the 30s AD. There are three or four matches for this particular pair of dies in the CCI, among the c. 100 of the basic type. The decoration at the base of the corn-ear is a bit more showy than usual.

CCI 04.0478 'plastic A' series, VA 2010-3. Believed to have preceded the classic type, so perhaps from c. 25 - 35 AD. About ninety of these are recorded here, and again there are a number of matches for both of these dies, including at least one coin in the British Museum (BMC 1819 in Hobbs's Catalogue of Iron Age coins in the BM).

CCI 04.0479 'linear' series, VA 1925-1. The earliest of these three, perhaps from c. 20 AD, and a little rarer, with about 60 recorded here. Again there is a coin in the BM from the same pair of dies, BMC 1783. There are a couple of rather unusual features to the dies - although not clear on your example because of the position it has been struck, there appears to be no V on the end of CAMV, and there's also a mark - perhaps some kind of privy mark - after the CVN on the reverse, you can just see the top of what looks like a letter I between the N and the horse'sfront legs on your coin.

On display in Colchester museum

Cunobelin (Colchester Celtic King) gold Qtr stater 10 to 40 AD 1.23g 10mm 'CCI No 04.0679 is the Cunobelin wild type stater, VA 1933-1. Again a nice example, 75 of the basic VA 1933 type recorded although there are some minor variations in the size of the star over the horse (Van Arsdell splits them into small and large, but it's not always easy to decide where small ends and large begins!). Probably somewhere around the middle of his reign, perhaps c. 20 - 25 AD'.

10-40 AD Cunobelin gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

1.33g, 12.82mm

13.0486

10-40 AD Cunobelin qtr gold stater - sent to CCI for recording

1.31g, 11.16mm

10 - 40 AD Cunobelin gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.32g, 12mm

0-40 AD Cunoblein Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.34g, 10.1mm

10-40 AD Cunobelin full gold stater - sent to PAS for recording

5.43g,19.8mm

10- 40 AD Cunobelin Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.31g, 11.16 mm

10- 40 AD Cunobelin Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.33g, 11.57mm

10-40 AD Cunobelin biga qtr stater, VA 1910, BMC 1769-1771, ABC 2771  Very rare.

11.48mm, 1.26g

Celtic gold Cunobelin stater - 'linear' series, VA 1925-1. The earliest of the rule, perhaps from c. 20 AD, and a little rarer, with about 60 recorded here

15.95, 5.48g

Sent to museum for recording

10-40 AD Cunobelin Cetic gold stater - 'linear' series, VA 1925-1. The earliest of the rule, perhaps from c. 20 AD

5.45g,16mm

Sent to museum for recording

c20 AD Cunobelin gold qtr stater - linear series - sent to PAS for recording

11.37mm,1.36g

10-40 AD Cunobelin Cetic gold stater - 'linear' series, VA 1925-1. The earliest of the rule, perhaps from c. 20 AD

5.45g,16mm

Dubnovellaunos 25 BC to 5 AD

Dubnovellaunus is the name of a king who, based on coin distribution, appears to have ruled over Kent east of the River Medway. He was the first king of the Cantiaci to issue inscribed coins: some of his coins appear to date from as early as 40-30 BC. Towards the end of the 1st century BC he seems to have been succeeded by a king called Vodenos or Vosenios, although it is possible the two kings' reigns were contemporary or overlapped.

A king called Dubnovellaunus succeeded his father Addedomarus as king of the Trinovantes ca. 10-5 BC and ruled for several years before being supplanted by Cunobelinus of the Catuvellauni.

   

Broken Celtic gold full stater - Dubnovellaunos 5 BC to 10 AD

1.68g, 13.74mm

The broken stater can be 13.0083.  By coincidence I was looking at these yesterday, it's a Dubnovellaunos in Essex stater, ABC 2392, BMC 2425-2440, Van Arsdell 1650; there should be just enough of the legend showing to be able to die link the reverse.  It's not a particularly rare type, over 100 in the Index at present.  Hope the rest turns up, it's not unknown for different fragments of the same coin to turn up years apart!

John

Eastern uninscribed Celtic gold qtr stater of Dubnovellaunos

12.25mm,1.3g

Dubnovellaunos in Essex quarter, VA 1660, BMC 2442, ABC 2395 CCI 12.0379

Dubnovellaunus tribe Celtic gold qtr stater-11.73mm,1.32g

Recorded as CCI 10.1046.

Gold quarter stater of Dubnovellaunos, c. 20 BC-AD 10

Linear wreath, with opposed crescents; Horse left with branch below and trefoil design above

VA 1660, BMC 2442

Around 25 provenanced examples of this type are known.... mainly from Essex or the Essex or Herts borders.

Ian

Ps. Note the figures for the British G quarter stater were also PROVENANCED examples only!

CCI 10.1045

1stC BC Celtic gold qtr stater - Eastern gold attributed to Dvbnovellaunos tribe

1.34g,11.67mm

Hobbs 2442 Page 146 Colchester find

'Eastern uninscribed gold quarter stater of Dubnovellaunos, c 20 BC-AD 10. Van Arsdell VA1660 =BMC 2442.

CCI number: 10.0874'

Ian

Dubnovellaunus c 20 BC-AD 10 Full Celtic gold stater

5.44g,17.57mm

'many thanks for these, they're both very fine coins. The Dubnovellaunus stater is VA 1655-5, and will be CCI 04.2295. We have records of just under 100 of the basic Dubnovellaunus stater type (VA 1650-1655); it can be very difficult to split them further without studying the individual dies, because key motifs such as the inscription are often off the edge of the flan, as here. In fact this example is struck a long way off-centre on the reverse, since it's unusual to see just about the whole of the motif beneath the branch under the horse.
Dubnovellaunus 20 BC-AD 10 gold full stater

Eastern uninscribed Celtic gold full stater of Dubnovellaunus, c 20 BC

Sent to CCI for recording

5.41g, 18.45mm

Stunning strike with full Kings inscription showing

Eastern uninscribed Celtic gold full stater of Dubnovellaunus, c 20 BC- sent to PAS ID and recording

5.39g,19.1mm

25BC Eastern uninscribed Celtic gold qtr stater of Dubnovellaunos

11mm,0.67g

 

Eastern uninscribed Celtic gold full stater of Dubnovellaunus, c 20 BC - sent to PAS for recording

5.42g,18.27mm

 

Durotrigan

50 BC Celtic gold Durotrigan quarter

0.89g,11.86mm

Durotrigan quarter, the exact type isn't in ABC but it's a variant of the standard ABC 2208 gold/electrum quarter but with one quadrant of the reverse stippled, probably dates to the 50s BC.  I've called it the Stippled type in my forthcoming book, there are around 40 others known at present so not desperately rare; all the known provenances are in the Dorset/Hampshire/West Sussex region so an Essex find would be exceptional.

All the best

John

60 - 50 BC Gallo Belgic

The first coins used in Britain were imported from Gaul from the 3rdC BC to the mid 1stC BC. The imported coins most frequently came from Gallia Belgica and called Gallo- Belic by numismatists.

 

50 BC Gallo Belgic full Celtic gold stater

6.24g, 18.72mm

A nice uniface stater, this is Scheers class 2, probably struck around 57-56 BC and one of the few Celtic coins that can be dated with some accuracy.  I've recorded it as 13.0004.

 

All the best
John

Beautiful strike of a 56 BC Gallo Belgic full Celtic gold stater sent to CCI for recording

16mm,6.28g

'the Gallo-Belgic E 'Gallic War uniface' stater is CCI 14.0530'

John Sills

Gallo Belgic 50 BC Celtic gold full stater

6.35g, 17.74

Hi Chris

It's a nice early one, from a known reverse die, from near the start of Gallo-Belgic E class 1 so should date to c.57 BC as the series probably began soon after the start of the Gallic Wars in 58/7; CCI 12.0837.

John

Continental Iron Age Gallo-Belgic DC uninscribed gold quarter state

This is a scarce variant of Gallo-Belgic D, the Face type, Scheers seies 14, my Gallo-Belgic Cd.  On one side there's a very worn 'boat' design and on the other a large, kidney shaped blob, also very worn, that looks like an outline face on other coins.  In 2003 I suggested they were struck by eastern neighbours of the Ambiani, perhaps by the Viromandui; there were 13 known at the time, perhaps 20-25 now including several from Britain, although I don't have the cards here.  I'll give it a number later with the next batch if that's OK with you,

All the best

John

1.60g, 9.43mm

50BC Celtic gold 1/4 stater - probably Snettisham type

1.57g, 14.22mm

Gallo-Belgic Aa quarter, probably my class 3 but too worn to be certain

CCI 12.0364

50 BC Celtic gold full stater - Gallo Belgic

16.49mm, 6.05g

Gallo-Belgic E stater, Scheers class 4.  Standard example of the type, several hundred known

CCI 12.0363

Gallo Belgic 50BC Celtic gold stater 6.38g, 16.96mm sent to CCI for recording Gallo Belic 50 BC Celtic gold full stater 6.30g, 17.59mm CCI 08.9323
50Bc Gallo Belgic Celtic gold stater - 17.42mm, 6.19g CCI 08.9320

50BC Gallo Belgic Celtic gold stater 6.24g - 16.58mm

'This'll be CCI 06.0190. Difficult to say exactly which class of uniface stater it is with this amount of wear - indeed it's quite unusual to see one which is this worn, it looks as though it knocked about a bit before being lost/deposited'.

Gallo-Belgic E stater, c. 56 BC. It's class 2 of the type, listed in Van Arsdell as VA 52. This will be 04.0476 in the CCI.

50BC Gallo Belgic Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording

17.28mm - 6.00g

I've recorded the Gallo-Belgic E as 13.0623.  It's a class 4 coin and can be dated quite precisely, probably to around 55/54 BC; it's from a known reverse die, there are several others with this characteristic die flaw below the horse's body.

Many thanks,

John

Beautiful strike of a 56 BC Gallo Belgic full Celtic gold stater - sent to PAS for recording

6.26g, 20 mm

Mint condition - 50 BC Celtic gold Gallic import qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

Crossed lines with rider ABC 37, VA 37

Classed as scare

1.94g, 12 mm

Caletes tribe, Normandy coast

50 BC Celtic gold Gallic import qtr stater - new one for me - sent to PAS for recording

Crossed lines with rider ABC 37, VA 37

Classed as scare

1.86g, 10.15mm

Caletes tribe, Normandy coast

0 BC Celtic gold Gallic import qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording
Crossed lines with rider ABC 37, VA 37
Classed as scare
Caletes tribe, Normandy coast

50 BC Gallo Belgic Celtic gold full stater- sent to PAS for recording

6.30g,17.7g

50 BC Gallo Belgic Celtic gold full stater- sent to PAS for recording

6.18g, 17.2mm

Ingoldisthorpe - Catuvellauni tribe

Ingoldisthorpe type, so called because the first was found at Ingoldisthorpe (say it ingulls-thawp) near Snettisham, Norfolk, 1989

It is the earliest known coinage of the Catuvellauni, and immediately precedes the much commoner Westerham type. The dies for Ingoldisthorpe staters are of such high quality that they must have been cut by a Gaulish engraver; they mimic Gallo-Belgic C but with a range of additional motifs not seen on Belgic coinage until the Gallic Wars of the 50s BC. For this reason, and because the Ingoldisthorpe and Westerham series as a whole has all the hallmarks of an emergency coinage, they were probably struck to finance Cassivellaunus' campaign against Caesar in 54 BC.

Stunning Celtic gold 1/4 stater- Unique animal design

1.45g,11.83mm

A gold Iron Age quarter stater, Early Uninscribed British series O 'Geometric' type, c.100-50 BC. Obverse close to Hobbs no. 416; VA1225

CCI 12.0369

Ingoldisthorpe quarter, ABC 2448, not in VA or BMC.  Another extremely rare type, good to have a reliable findspot, this one is from the same dies as ABC 2448 itself.

Morini

The Morini were a Belgic tribe of northern Gaul. They were mentioned in such classical works as the Commentarii de Bello Gallico written by Julius Caesar.They became an established part of the Roman empire with the coastal parts of the present-day départment of Pas-de-Calais in northernmost France, bordering on the English Channel.

This looks like a 70BC Morini boat tree Celtic gold qtr stater but it could be another very rare North Thames type based on Gallo-Belgic D Boat Tree quarters

1.51g,10.18mm

10.35mm, 1.46g

70BC Morini boat tree Celtic gold qtr stater - reported to museum as hoard and sent to CCI for recording

The latest Gallo-Belgic D quarter 12.0857; it looks like there should be quite a few more given that half a dozen have come up in fairly rapid succession.  This type of hoard is extremely useful because the Gallo-Belgic gold can be dated quite closely so it helps to date the start of British coinage.

 

All the best

John

70BC Morini Boat Tree type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

1.49g, 10.40mm

Reported as hoard to museum

70BC Morini Boat Tree type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

1.45g, 9.63mm

Reported as hoard to museum

70 BC Morini 'boat tree' Celtic qtr stater

1.42g,10.14mm

Gallo-Belgic D ‘boat type’ quarter, Scheers class 3

CCI 12.0366

A Continental Iron Age Gallo-Belgic DC uninscribed gold quarter stater, Gallo-Belgic DC , dating circa 70-50 BC. VA 69-1.

1.60g, 9.23mm

Gallo-Belgic D quarter (my G-B Ca).  Probably my class 3, obverse worn flat

CCI 12.0365

70BC Morini Celtic 'boat tree' gold qtr stater - Sent to CCI for recording 1.41g, 10.81mm

70BC Morini Celtic 'boat tree' gold qtr stater - Sent to CCI for recording

Very interesting example being the lightest we have ever found and the smallest diameter. Normal weight range of a Morini is 1.41-1.45g

Also a very different die type so it will be interesting to see the comments from the CCI experts

1.23g, 9.22mm

70BC Morini Celtic 'boat tree' gold qtr stater - Sent to CCI for recording

1.45g, 10.80mm

70BC Morini Celtic gold qtr stater - Sent to CCI for recording

1.48g, 10.86mm

Gallo-Belgic Dc gold quarter stater. “Morini”, c. 60-50 BC.

“Boat” and “tree” like designs

Delestree & Tache 249, VA 69-1, Scheers 13, pl. 5.115-117.

These are obviously pretty common finds all along the Thames/SE.

Ian

70BC Morini Celtic gold qtr stater - Sent to CCI for recording

1.44g,10.27mm

CCI number 10.0887

70BC Morini 'boat tree' type Celtic gold 1/4 stater 1.48g, 10.28 mm

70BC Morini 'boat tree' type Celtic gold 1/4 stater 1.46g, 11.33 mm

 

2.87g, 26.93mm

70BC Morini 'boat tree' Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

11.07mm, 1.48g

Thanks for this, what a good start to the season!

I think it's still stars - it would be nice to think that it's an
inscription but I'm afraid I'm not convinced. Sometimes the stars are a
little elongated so it can give the impression of letters, but I'll need
a bit more convincing yet. Anyway it's a very fine coin, good to see so
much detail on both sides.

This'll be CCI 08.9087.

70BC Morini 'boat tree' Celtic gold 1/4 stater 1.48g, 11.87 mm - CCI 07.0123

70BC Morini 'boat tree' Celtic gold 1/4 stater 1.45g, 11.61mm - CCI 06.0187

'The G-B quarter is a lovely coin, looks very sharp. There is a distinctive class of these which have all the little crosses around the 'boat' - they're not uncommon, but not always as nice as this'.

Morini ' boat tree' type c 70BC Celtic quarter stater 1.41g, 11.0 mm

CCI 05.0751

Morini ' boat tree' type c 70BC Celtic quarter stater - 1.45g 11mm
Celtic quarter Morini boat tree 70 BC

Celtic quarter Morini boat tree 70 BC

'6th hoard coin' quarter with two lines on the reverse rather than the usual tree pattern, 1.45g, is 13.0075

70BC Morini Boat Tree type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

1.45g,12.54mm

Reported as hoard to museum

13.0669 - Gallo-Belgic D quarter no. 2 (1.45g), this is the 'Y' or Branch type, not in ABC, very slightly earlier than the standard type, say 57 BC, quite scarce although more are turning up.  Struck from a worn reverse die where the central line has developed a long flaw that makes it look like a branch.

70BC Morini Boat Tree type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording

1.46g, 11.41mm

Reported as hoard to museum

13.0668 - Gallo-Belgic D quarter no. 1 (1.46g), ABC 40 type struck early in the Gallic Wars, around 56 BC or so.

70BC Morini Celtic gold 'boat tree' qtr stater - reported to museum as hoard

1.49g, 9.97mm (E)

70BC Morini Celtic gold 'boat tree' qtr stater - reported to museum as hoard

1.46g, 11.06mm (J)

70BC Morni Celtic gold qtr stater reported to museum as haord

1.45g, 10.38mm

70BC Morini Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording and reported as hoard to museum

1.46g, 11.55mm

70BC Morini Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording and reported as hoard to museum

1.45g, 10.75mm

70BC Morini Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to CCI for recording and reported as hoard to museum

1.14g, 11.52mm

70BC Celtic gold Morini qtr gold stater- sent to CCI for recording and reported as hoard addendum to museum

1.47g,11.27mm dia

The Gallo-Belgic D 'boat type' quarter you sent through in February is CCI 14.0529

John Sills

70BC Morini Celtic gold qtr - sent to PAS for recording

1.51g, 10.5mm

 

70 BC Morini Celtic gold qtr stater

1.46g,10.27mm

Reported to museum as hoard

 

50 BC Norfolk wolf type - Iceni tribe

The Icenior Eceni were a tribe a part of Britannia or Britain who inhabited an area corresponding roughly to the modern-day county of Norfolk from the 1st century BC to the 1st century AD. They were bordered by the Corieltauvi to the west, and the Catuvellauni and Trinovantes to the south. The tribe turned into a civitas during the Roman occupation of Britannia. Their capital was Venta Icenorum.

Julius Caesar described the Iceni as Cenimagni, who surrendered to him during his second expedition to Britain in 54 BC. The Cenimagni may have been a branch of the Iceni or it could be a corruption of Iceni Magni meaning "Great Iceni".

Celtic gold stater Norfolk wolf type 65-45 BC

'CCI No 04.0681 is the Norfolk wolf. Another nice coin, c. 50 BC. The basic type is common (over 300 coins) but there are minor variations in the design, and this appears to be a rare variant with a sort of stick below the wolf rather than the usual crescent and pellet. I haven't checked through all the records but from memory there are no more than half a dozen or so from this die variant'.

North Thames - these include the Catuvellauni & Trinovantes

Celtic gold stater 16.76mm,5.89g - sent to CCI for recording

'This is quite a rare type, as you no doubt appreciate. The best parallel is provided by three coins in the British Museum, listed in their catalogue as nos. 3353-55. It's one of a group of coins loosely described as the Snettisham staters, because several of the types were first recognized in one of the Snettisham (Norfolk) hoards of the early 1990s. The exact type is not in Van Arsdell although it's closely related to the North Thames types listed as VA 1500, 1502 and thereabouts. It is presumably an East Anglian type, although because of the stylistic similarities there must have been some very strong link between the producers of the Snettisham types and the North Thames types. Date c. 50 - 40 BC, I think.

Interesting Celtic gold find - it appears to be the first right facing Dubnovellaunus Late 1st BC to Early 1stC AD Full Celtic gold stater found here 5.73g, 17.13mm

'This is quite a rare type, as you no doubt appreciate. The best parallel is provided by three coins in the British Museum, listed in their catalogue as nos. 3353-55. It's one of a group of coins loosely described as the Snettisham staters, because several of the types were first recognized in one of the Snettisham (Norfolk) hoards of the early 1990s. The exact type is not in Van Arsdell although it's closely related to the North Thames types listed as VA 1500, 1502 and thereabouts. It is presumably an East Anglian type, although because of the stylistic similarities there must have been some very strong link between the producers of the Snettisham types and the North Thames types. Date c. 50 - 40 BC, I think.

I'll record it as CCI 07.1164. '


Philip

North Thames type Celtic gold stater 5.54g - 16.93

'many thanks for this one, a rare one indeed. It's an example of VA 1509, also in the BM catalogue (BMC 350) and no. 34 in 'Coins of England'. It usually has a couple of S shapes on the obverse, although I can't see any traces of them here - the obverse is sometimes worn though. It seems to be a North Thames type, to judge from the few provenances available, but there are only six examples previously recorded so it is a rare type. I would guess quite early too, perhaps 40s BC. Certainly one of the best Celtic you've had so far, thanks! It'll be CCI 06.0195'.

1/4 Uninscribed Celtic gold stater 1.43g, 12.98mm

'Yes, this is interesting. It's an uninscribed quarter stater, traditionally attributed to the Atrebates (in the South Thames) but almost certainly a North Thames issue. We have records of about 25 of them, and without exception they've come from the North Thames area: it was previously attributed to the Atrebates because of the style, which resembles their uninscribed quarter staters with a wreath on the obverse. The date of this quarter would be around c. 45 BC, I would estimate, so like the Whaddon Chase it could be just a little earlier than the Addedomaros coins. It is catalogued in Van Arsdell as VA 260-1, but not only wrongly as Atrebates but also listed as silver. Many of the surviving examples are struck from the same pair of dies, which develop some fairly major flaws, especially on the reverse; the lack of many dies suggests this wasn't a very big issue, in comparison to the Addedomaros spiral for example.

If I remember rightly there are one or two examples of this type in the huge East Leicestershire hoards which came up about 3 years ago, but mostly they're Essex/Suffolk area. This'll be CCI 05.0683'.

Not a 70 BC Celtic Morini boat tree qtr gold stater as I first thought - rare North Thames type

1.48g, 10.58mm

This coin is an important find because although it's a type based on Gallo-Belgic D Boat Tree quarters it's an early British copy, ABC 2454, from the same dies as the one illustrated in the book.  Although ABC says it's excessively rare there are actually around 20 known, but there are very few reliable findspots and this one helps to confirm it's a North Thames type.  I've recorded it as 13.0002 (got some new numbers through at last).

All the best

John 

Very interesting Celtic gold qtr gold stater - sent to CCI for ID and recording

Reminds me of a 50BC North Thames type

1.54g, 13.51mm dia

70 BC Morini Celtic qtr stater - reported to PAS for recording

1.41g, 9.9mm

70BC Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.44g, 10.8mm

'Remi

The Remi were a Belgic people of north-eastern Gaul (Gallia Belgica). The Romans regarded them as a civitas, a major and influential polity of Gaul,The Remi occupied the northern Champagne plain, on the southern fringes of the Forest of Ardennes, between the rivers Mosa (Meuse) and Matrona (Marne), and along the river valleys of the Aisne and its tributaries the Aire and the Vesle.

Their capital was at Durocortum (Reims, France) the second largest oppidum of Gaul on the Vesle. Allied with the Germanic tribes of the east, they repeatedly engaged in warfare against the Parisii and the Senones.They were renowned for their horses and cavalry.

Early 70BC uninscribed 'Q' Gold - 'Remi 'Type Celtic gold qtr stater

1.35g, 12.24mm

Maldon Wheel quarter, not in VA or BMC, ABC 2234.  Extremely rare, 12 others known, struck from known dies but from a new die combination so a very useful coin to have, especially with a reliable provenance.

CCI 12.0378

Early 70BC uninscribed 'Q' Gold - 'Remi 'Type Celtic gold qtr stater

Rev .horse r.,from nrck pellet ring var.d above pellet in ring,flower j & pellet-in-ring,before 4 pellet-in-rings,below wheel f & pellet, below & above tail pellet-in-ring triangle

1.34g,14.86mm Hobbs 482

70 BC Remi tribe Celtic gold 1/4 stater - sent to CCI for recording and ID

1.14g,12.55mm

50 BC 1/4 Celtic gold stater 14.32mm, 1.36g Similar to a Southern Commios tribe

Early 70BC uninscribed 'Q' Gold - 'Remi 'Type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

1.35g,13.74mm

Early 70BC Maldon Wheel quarter - 'Remi 'Type Celtic gold qtr stater - sent to PAS for recording

13.45mm,1.34g

 

50 - 20 BC Essex Wheels quarter, VA 260, BMC 485 and 496, ABC 2231 - sent to museum for recording

1.41g,15.1mm

 

 

 

Essex Wheels type - Trinovantian

50 - 20 BC Essex Wheels quarter, VA 260, BMC 485 and 496, ABC 2231. Quite a rare Trinovantian type

1.4g, 14.42mm - sent to CCI for recording and ID confirmation.

14.65mm,1.39g

Essex Wheels quarter, VA 260, BMC 485 and 496, ABC 2231.  Quite a rare Trinovantian type, two others from this pair of dies.

 

CCI 12.0371

 
The second is an Eastern uninscribed gold quarter stater, type attributed to the Trinovantes, struck c 50-20 BC.
VA 260 = BMC (Hobbs) 485 and 496.
These are interesting as they are clearly of Southern style (Atrebates etc), but are an Eastern or North Thames (Trinovantes etc) type as the distribution of findspots seems to show.
 
I have records of 20 provenanced examples of these (including 12 Essex and 4 suffolk)
 
I have given this the number 10.0888
 
Ian
 

 

54 BC - 40 BC Whaddon Chase - Trinovantian

Big Wheel Type Middle Whaddon Chase gold stater, so named on account of the large spoked chariot wheel (representing the sun) which is under the spritely horse.

50 BC Middle Whaddon Chase stater Celtic gold full stater 5.45g, 17.21mm

Obv cross of 3 plain & 2 pellet lines with 2 opposed crescents b in centre

Rev horse r ., above pellet in ring, pellet in wheel below

Middle Whaddon Chase stater, VA 1491, BMC 343, ABC 2240.  An extremely rare type, only 7 others known, very nice to see another one.  This one seems to be from the same obverse die as 95.2630, same rev as CR 116, 2011, no. 32.  Reverse similar to early staters of Addedomaros but an uninscribed type, much rarer.

CCI 12.0368

1stC BC Uninscribed 'L' 'Waddon Chase type' Celtic gold full stater - sent to CCI for recording

5,86g, 1.6mm

'These coins are probably not very much earlier than the Addedomaros staters - it all depends really on when one dates the Addedomaros issue. It seems fairly certain that the Whaddon Chase staters could be from the later stages of the Gallic War, say about 54 BC at the earliest; they could be a little bit later, but are unlikely to be after say 40 BC at the very latest.'

Dr Philip de Jersey

   
Celtic gold qtr stater 13.56,1.29mm

'Snettisham' type ? Celtic gold full stater 5.85g - 17.05mm

'Having seen this one I've had to think again about 05.0680, the Whaddon Chase type I wrote about earlier. Although quite different in their individual style these are probably both the same variety of WC stater, actually listed as VA 1498. This is a rather puzzling type because it's not clear whether it really belongs to the WC group or - as you suggested - the Snettisham type. There are 18 examples of it here and those with findspots are a mixture of Essex, Suffolk and Norfolk - on that basis it could arguably be either WC or Snettisham. In terms of style, they are perhaps among the very last WC staters rather than being the first Snettisham, which appear to have been based on the Whaddon Chase design. In terms of date this might only be a difference of a few months, and almost certainly not more than a few years, so it's perhaps unreasonable to expect we'll be able to tie it down quite so neatly. CCI 05.0687'.

 

Celtic gold stater 'Whadden Chase' type 5.95g, 17.68 mm

The Whaddon Chase stater (yes, it is that type) will be CCI 05.0680. These coins are probably not very much earlier than the Addedomaros staters - it all depends really on when one dates the Addedomaros issue. It seems fairly certain that the Whaddon Chase staters could be from the later stages of the Gallic War, say about 54 BC at the earliest; they could be a little bit later, but are unlikely to be after say 40 BC at the very latest. If Addedomaros's spiral staters are his latest stater issues, then they could be somewhere around 30-25 BC, so perhaps up to 25 years later than Whaddon Chase. It just depends where each type fits, and we don't have an exact idea. I suppose it's true to say though that there is almost certainly a minimum of ten years between them, and more likely 20.

One of my colleagues recently suggested that the WC staters were issued by Cassivellaunus, to pay off Caesar during the Gallic War. They certainly seem to be found mostly in the territory of the Catuvellauni (so this one would be a bit further east than usual . The main catalogue reference for this type is VA 1476 in Van Arsdell's 'Celtic Coinage of Britain'. They're relatively common (300 or so recorded) but a lot of these are finds from the original WC hoard, found in Bucks in 1849.

 
Unique Celtic gold coin

One of a kind Celtic gold 1/4 stater

Latest views from the experts

"it's an early (perhaps c. 50-40 BC) quarter stater, possibly produced in Essex.
It seems to have developed out of the Gallo-Belgic D quarter stater (Van Arsdell
69), imported in large quantities into Britain from Belgic Gaul, possibly with
some influence from the so-called 'Kentish trophy type' (Van Arsdell 147) of a
very similar period.

This particular type is unpublished in any major catalogue,